I Talk The Talk While Running The Run!


An introspective viewpoint based on the conversations between Jay Stephenson and Christopher Rodriguez

By Christopher Rodriguez and Coach Jay Stephenson

John L. Parker once wrote that runners “gab like magpies”. When I first started running I thought I would be like that, but found out that I didn’t have any breath to talk or even to notice what was going on around me. Over the years however, I have grown strong and mean. What does this have to do with gabbing you ask? I now do hours of running alone, with a few people or just one other running buddy. I have noticed that my ability to talk has slowly turned from one-word answers to full on sentences and conversations!

I never realized how much I enjoyed gabbing like a magpie until I got in the habit of talking while running. Talks for me have been about everything from racing to colorful debates on political issues like Feminism and Fair Tax. To make it worse, running has started to make positive things happen thanks to my big mouth!

First, I usually form a deep bond with people that I share the “mile of trials” with.  Over the years I think this bond has been made even deeper and stronger still by all those talks I have had.

Secondly, and most importantly, is that the issues of life often get solved on the run as I bounce ideas off a buddy’s head while we run. Then again, that is probably just the so called a runner’s high.
So if you are high enough to loosen up your jaw for a complete stranger, what are you going to say? Usually the first thing that people talk about on the run is how long they have been running, where they are from and how fast they are.

Funny that in a social setting, say a dinner party, this is not the usual thing people talk about when they first meet each other? For example: “Hi my name is Christopher and I like to run and I live outside of Atlanta and do Real Estate” should be on a card for me to handout when I go to a social event because that is the first thing people usually ask about. At this so called “typical get-together” people are not stuck side by side for an hour over hill and dale.

The sharing of hardships on a run makes it so that the typical run starts with a conversation and results in an improved relationship.  The strength of relationships built on a run is similar to that of members of active military groups or disaster survivors. The best part is the typical rules to conversation and friendships are usually invalid. For example, if a snot rocket is launched out of your nose in an unexpected fashion a similar unexpected factoid might loosed from your running partner.
While on a run conversations can begin unexpectedly. Some say this freedom and ease of conversation is due to the chemicals that are released while running or the large doses of oxygen going in your brain on the way to your legs and lungs. Running with someone is a unique place to share your thoughts.  Maybe it is the fact that you don’t have to look at each other that clears the air to talk while you run.

That being said, conversations that make you passionate have a positive affect on your run! Talk about dating, jobs or an upcoming race and you might start running faster because you get excited! Talk about a funny story and you might slow down with laughter.
Communication is a natural and important part of human behavior and as luck would have it, so is physical activity. If you can’t tell, I love running and I enjoy sharing this joy with others. John L. Parker wrote something that describes this well “the time on a grandfather clock doesn’t accurately reflect the time it takes to run ten miles”. This was simply stating that talking while on a run makes the run go by faster. A lot of people talk about a lot of different things for different reasons but in the end, people need to exercise and they need to talk, so why not kill two birds with one stone? After all if mental training is therapy, and physical training is running then running and talking must be really great!

-Christopher Rodriguez is a Real Estate novelist, meaning that he enjoys the novelty of his Real Estate salesman profession and he resides outside of Atlanta Georgia. Christopher runs over 3000 miles a year with as many people as he can find and take pleasure in writing about himself in the 3rd person.

Why Are Whole Grains Good For You?


By Great Harvest Bakery Owner Carol Rutledge

There is quite a buzz these days about eating whole grains and thankfully so. The United States Military is now serving soldiers whole grains over processed grains. Michelle Obama is advocating whole grains in the schools. Best-Selling food author Michael Pollan is telling us to eat foods closest to nature, like whole grains, because they’re healthier and tastier.

Yet, knowing which products are truly whole grain and healthy can be confusing! Especially when so many commercially produced products can contain puzzling claims.

Understanding what constitutes a whole grain product is pretty simple. The product must feature all parts of the grain – the bran, germ and endosperm. If any of the parts are removed, so is the whole grain designation. Refined grains are those that have one or two grain parts removed, which removes naturally occurring nutrients and other healthful benefits like fiber.

The bran, the outer most layer of a grain kernel, is where the fiber comes from along with some vitamins and minerals. The endosperm of a grain is mainly the carbohydrate source. It contains good things like trace proteins, vitamins and minerals. The germ of the kernel is a nutrient powerhouse because it contains good fats and vitamins, especially B and E and minerals.

3 Whole Grain Servings a Day

Whole grains are good for you. The Dietary Guidelines for Americans by MyPyramid (the FDA food) recommends three or more servings a day. Why? Because whole grains among other things, have been shown to reduce the risk of heart disease, type 2 diabetes, strokes and certain types of cancers. Whole grains are also great for weight management because they provide a consistent source of energy and help you stay fuller longer.

The essential vitamins found in whole grains include iron, zinc, potassium, magnesium, folic acid and many B-vitamins. Surprising but true- whole grains from wheat and oats are equal in antioxidant activity to spinach and broccoli! Plus, carbohydrates are the only source of energy for your red blood cells and are a main source of energy for the brain and central nervous system. This is particularly important during pregnancy. Also, children who eat more whole grains reduce their risk of obesity, diabetes and asthma.

The big picture for good health is to remember that a diet rich in whole natural foods, such as whole grains, fresh vegetables and fruits is rich in vitamins, fiber, minerals and antioxidants, which are essential to your health and lifestyle. The key is to eat delicious, nutritious foods closest to nature – like whole grains.


By Guest Author Carol Rutledge

Carol’s passion for nutrition and baking led her to open the Great Harvest Bread Co. in Rome, GA. She loves offering Rome the best tasting breads and sweets around. She is a 3rd generation native “Roman”.

GoGoRunning Has a New Headquarters

GoGoRunning now has a physical meting space, Just Sports! On January 2, 2013 GoGoRunning President Powell Fulton and Founder Coach Jay Stephenson purchased Just Sports and Tennis!

We now have gait analysis, and awesome fit process to get you in the right shoe, VO2max testing, group runs from the store, and in-store race registration (race directors please contact coachjay@gogorunning.com for details). We hope to serve the running, walking, day hiking and tennis community in Rome well.

 

 

New Group Run

The new group run will take place on Thursdays at 6:00pm, starting from Just Sports and Tennis. Join us for a 30minute-1hour run on the paved trails of downtown Rome. Park in any of the adjoining parking lots to the store.

296 W 3rd St SW
Rome, GA 30165

Compartment Syndrome Tips from 1:52 800m Runner

Allen O’Neal had the pressure test done to determine if he had compartment syndrome and the test was positive. He decided not to do the surgery but instead to focus on flexibility and massage to lessen the symptoms of the compartment syndrome.

3 Tips for Running with Compartment Syndrome

1. Before running massage each calf for one min approximately making sure to get each one loose. Do some light stretching after the massage and then do the lunge matrix.

2. If the calf’s hurt during a run or workout, sit on your knees and shins with tops of feet flat on the ground to stretch them out. Also massage the calf’s a bit in between intervals after sitting on your knees.

3. After your run massage both calves for approximately one min within 10 mins of finishing any run.

Do each of the three steps everyday before running and after and it should help ease pain in calves. It may take a few weeks, but they should start to loosen up.

Also think of keeping your legs relaxed as you run. Staying hydrated seems to help my calf’s to stay loose as well. When you’re hydrated the muscles can move independently and not stick together. Being dehydrated is like trying to slide down a water slide without any water.

What are your compartment syndrome tips?

Running is Ultimately an Expression of Our Spirit


At the GoGo Running All-Area High School Banquet, Dr. Wm. Richard Kremer spoke. We thought it was so powerful that it deserved a blog post. This the seventh post in a series of seven. Be ready to be inspired by his words:

Seventh and finally, Running Ultimately Does not Build Character but Reveal it. Running is ultimately an expression of our spirit. Regardless of how the external world measures wins and losses, we know from the inside that how we close that last hundred yards, how we attack that last high hill, how we respond when the guy or girl in front of us ups the pace — those challenges attest to the vitality and mettle of our inner being.

I suppose most of you are too young to remember the movie “Chariots of Fire,” but I encourage you to rent it for an evening sometime soon. One of the runners featured in that movie was a Scottish Christian named Eric Liddell, the son of British missionaries to China who returned to Britain for his education and became one of the most celebrated runners in the world. Eric Liddell was questioned as to how he balanced his Christian faith and his running passion, and he answered, “I believe God made me for a purpose. But he also made me fast and when I run I feel His pleasure.”

Liddell refused to run his specialty, the 100 meter, at the 1924 Olympic Games because its preliminaries were held on a Sunday, and he didn’t compete on a Sunday for religious reasons. Instead, he entered the 400 meter dash and won the gold. That’s where the movie ends. But, as the old commentator Paul Harvey used to say – “Here’s the rest of the story.” Having gained world-wide fame, with a life of celebrity and riches offered to him, Eric Liddell returned to China as a missionary, where he was eventually imprisoned in a concentration camp by the Japanese during World War II. I came across the testimony of a young girl who was also in that same camp, and she testified to meeting this Christian leader that all the kids called ‘Uncle Eric,” who kept improvising games to keep the kids’ spirits up. She said she and the other kids knew in a vague way that “Uncle Eric” was famous, but they didn’t know why. But they knew this: his enthusiasm and joyous spirit kept them filled with hope throughout those dark, hopeless years in the concentration camp.

The same joy, enthusiasm, discipline and purpose that Eric Liddell displayed as a world class runner were the qualities he employed in bolstering the morale of inmates in a desperate situation. Even the prison guards regarded his integrity so highly that they asked him to prepare their food. When Great Britain tried freeing Eric Liddell by arranging a prisoner exchange, he gave up his spot to a pregnant woman, choosing to remain with the other prisoners until they could be freed. Most of the other prisoners were indeed freed, but Eric Liddell died of malnourishment and a brain tumor a few weeks before their liberation. His last words were, “It is complete surrender.” “It is complete surrender.” Such was the way he approached his running, his life and his faith.

So, too, my hope and prayer is that when you run, you feel God’s pleasure. My hope and prayer is that you use your running to express the joy, strength, passion and purpose of your soul. For if you achieve this ambition, you will have
realized the essence of what the privilege of running is all about. God bless you.

Running is…


Dr. Wm. Richard Kremer, is currently the pastor of Garden Lakes Baptist Church in Rome. Dr. Kremer has spent most of a lifetime involved in track and field as a participant and coach. He would characterize himself presently as a “very slow recreational runner.”

Dr. Kremer was the indoor 440 champion of the state of Alabama in 1973 and was part of the Jefferson Davis High (Montgomery, Ala.) team that finished that year undefeated. He received a full track scholarship to the University of Georgia, where he competed in a variety of cross country and track events.

He placed fourth in the SEC Championships of 1974 and 1975 in the 600 yard dash, setting a school record of 1:11.5 that stood for many years. A summa cum laude graduate, Dr. Kremer was inducted into Phi Beta Kappa and nominated for the Rhodes Scholarship.

Upon graduation with a double major in English and History, Dr. Kremer attended the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary in Louisville, Kentucky, where he earned a Master’s of Divinity and Ph.D. in Systematic Theology. While in Louisville, Dr. Kremer ran for the Mason Dixon Athletic Club, continuing to win local and regional events while working on his Master’s. While running for the Mason Dixon AC, Dr. Kremer was part of a formidable distance medley relay team that included British Olympian Nick Rose.

Running is a Mystery to be Enjoyed


At the GoGo Running All-Area High School Banquet, Dr. Wm. Richard Kremer spoke. We thought it was so powerful that it deserved a blog post. This the sixth post in a series of seven. Be ready to be inspired by his words:

Sixth, Running Is a Mystery to be Enjoyed. I speak as a former racer to present racers: there is not always a direct correlation between what you put into your sport and what you get out of it. That can be a frustrating reality – but it is reality.

You can train perfectly for a race, can discipline yourself intensely, then go out and run a horrible race. Or you can go through a period where injury and circumstance prevent you from preparing as you would like, only to then go out and breeze through a personal best. This is true of running at every level.

When I was competing in middle distances there was a brilliant British half-miler named Sebastian Coe who won the gold medal in the 800 meter at the 1980 Olympic Games. Yet Sebastian Coe once said, “You know, my goal is to put my foot on the pedal with three hundred meters to go. Sometimes there is gas in the tank, sometimes there is not. I never know when the gas will be there and when it won’t.” That’s a world class runner talking, and his quote simply underscores my point: the mystery as to why our bodies do what they do can never be fully explained. You just have to accept and enjoy the fact that running is a mystery to be enjoyed.

Running is…


Dr. Wm. Richard Kremer, is currently the pastor of Garden Lakes Baptist Church in Rome. Dr. Kremer has spent most of a lifetime involved in track and field as a participant and coach. He would characterize himself presently as a “very slow recreational runner.”

Dr. Kremer was the indoor 440 champion of the state of Alabama in 1973 and was part of the Jefferson Davis High (Montgomery, Ala.) team that finished that year undefeated. He received a full track scholarship to the University of Georgia, where he competed in a variety of cross country and track events.

He placed fourth in the SEC Championships of 1974 and 1975 in the 600 yard dash, setting a school record of 1:11.5 that stood for many years. A summa cum laude graduate, Dr. Kremer was inducted into Phi Beta Kappa and nominated for the Rhodes Scholarship.

Upon graduation with a double major in English and History, Dr. Kremer attended the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary in Louisville, Kentucky, where he earned a Master’s of Divinity and Ph.D. in Systematic Theology. While in Louisville, Dr. Kremer ran for the Mason Dixon Athletic Club, continuing to win local and regional events while working on his Master’s. While running for the Mason Dixon AC, Dr. Kremer was part of a formidable distance medley relay team that included British Olympian Nick Rose.

Running is a Discipline


At the GoGo Running All-Area High School Banquet, Dr. Wm. Richard Kremer spoke. We thought it was so powerful that it deserved a blog post. This the fifth post in a series of seven. Be ready to be inspired by his words:

Fifth, Running is a Discipline whose virtues carry over into every aspect of your life. It is not only true that everything you do affects your running; your running affects everything you do.

Running teaches you to distinguish between “wishing” and “wanting.” Lots of people “wish” they could do their best, but they aren’t wiling to make the lifestyle changes necessary to turn their wishes into reality. Running is about setting goals and wanting those goals so passionately that you make the sacrifices necessary to attain them. Even when you don’t attain your goals, the experience of chasing them empowers you.

All of life is about distinguishing “wishing” from “wanting,” and the skill set and attitudes you develop in pursuing those goals you truly want in track and cross country are the same skill set and attitudes that will empower you to move beyond wishing to achieve those goals you truly want to attain in every ambit of your career.

Running is…


Dr. Wm. Richard Kremer, is currently the pastor of Garden Lakes Baptist Church in Rome. Dr. Kremer has spent most of a lifetime involved in track and field as a participant and coach. He would characterize himself presently as a “very slow recreational runner.”

Dr. Kremer was the indoor 440 champion of the state of Alabama in 1973 and was part of the Jefferson Davis High (Montgomery, Ala.) team that finished that year undefeated. He received a full track scholarship to the University of Georgia, where he competed in a variety of cross country and track events.

He placed fourth in the SEC Championships of 1974 and 1975 in the 600 yard dash, setting a school record of 1:11.5 that stood for many years. A summa cum laude graduate, Dr. Kremer was inducted into Phi Beta Kappa and nominated for the Rhodes Scholarship.

Upon graduation with a double major in English and History, Dr. Kremer attended the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary in Louisville, Kentucky, where he earned a Master’s of Divinity and Ph.D. in Systematic Theology. While in Louisville, Dr. Kremer ran for the Mason Dixon Athletic Club, continuing to win local and regional events while working on his Master’s. While running for the Mason Dixon AC, Dr. Kremer was part of a formidable distance medley relay team that included British Olympian Nick Rose.

Running is a Gift to be Enjoyed


At the GoGo Running All-Area High School Banquet, Dr. Wm. Richard Kremer spoke. We thought it was so powerful that it deserved a blog post. This the forth post in a series of seven. Be ready to be inspired by his words:

Fourth, Running Is a Gift to be Enjoyed in its many stages. Perhaps the best way I can explain this point is by noting the name that a friend of mine gave his running shoe store. He called it “Jogger, Runner, Racer.”

Most of you are at the Racer stage of your careers. Respect the privilege that you have and do your utmost to maximize your talent. But understand that your racing career represents but a fraction of your running pilgrimage. I raced competitively for about twenty years, until the press of church work and academics forced me to surrender the racing life.

But that didn’t mean I had to give up running. It has remained a part of my lifestyle, an essential component of my being. I call myself a runner, even though what I call running now is what I would have called jogging ten years ago. But that doesn’t mean I can’t continue the sense of being “in training”; that doesn’t meant I can’t continue to compete against myself – and test myself in the process.

You are at a privileged stage in your running pilgrimage: make the most of it. But know that this is a lifestyle you can continue to enjoy and can continue to shape and improve your life even after your racing days are over. Running is a gift to be enjoyed in its many stages.

Running is…

 


Dr. Wm. Richard Kremer, is currently the pastor of Garden Lakes Baptist Church in Rome. Dr. Kremer has spent most of a lifetime involved in track and field as a participant and coach. He would characterize himself presently as a “very slow recreational runner.”

Dr. Kremer was the indoor 440 champion of the state of Alabama in 1973 and was part of the Jefferson Davis High (Montgomery, Ala.) team that finished that year undefeated. He received a full track scholarship to the University of Georgia, where he competed in a variety of cross country and track events.

He placed fourth in the SEC Championships of 1974 and 1975 in the 600 yard dash, setting a school record of 1:11.5 that stood for many years. A summa cum laude graduate, Dr. Kremer was inducted into Phi Beta Kappa and nominated for the Rhodes Scholarship.

Upon graduation with a double major in English and History, Dr. Kremer attended the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary in Louisville, Kentucky, where he earned a Master’s of Divinity and Ph.D. in Systematic Theology. While in Louisville, Dr. Kremer ran for the Mason Dixon Athletic Club, continuing to win local and regional events while working on his Master’s. While running for the Mason Dixon AC, Dr. Kremer was part of a formidable distance medley relay team that included British Olympian Nick Rose.

Running is no Respecter of Origins


At the GoGo Running All-Area High School Banquet, Dr. Wm. Richard Kremer spoke. We thought it was so powerful that it deserved a blog post. This the third post in a series of seven. Be ready to be inspired by his words:

Third, Running is No Respecter of Origins. I say that because many runners labor under an inferiority complex. Oh, they think, I run for a small school, or I’m from a small town, or I’m not very well known among the highly-touted runners of the state, or I don’t have access to the best training techniques or facilities.

Listen, speed can come from anywhere. Stamina knows no area code. You may be a small town kid, but that doesn’t mean you don’t have big-time talent. I remember well a cold, blustery March day in 1976 when I was starting my outdoor season at some podunk track amidst an insignificant event known as the Morehouse Relays, held at tiny Morehouse College in Atlanta. I happened to look up during the 400 meter intermediate hurdles and saw this tall, gawky black kid clearing the hurdles somewhat awkwardly down the backstretch – awkwardly, but with plenty of raw speed in between barriers. This tall, gawky unknown black kid won the race handily – and he kept winning every race I saw him run that year, including the Olympic gold medal.

His name? Edwin Moses, who went on to become one of the most dominant runners the track world has ever seen. No matter who you are or where you’re from, speed can come from anywhere – for Running is no respecter of origins.

Running is…


Dr. Wm. Richard Kremer, is currently the pastor of Garden Lakes Baptist Church in Rome. Dr. Kremer has spent most of a lifetime involved in track and field as a participant and coach. He would characterize himself presently as a “very slow recreational runner.”

Dr. Kremer was the indoor 440 champion of the state of Alabama in 1973 and was part of the Jefferson Davis High (Montgomery, Ala.) team that finished that year undefeated. He received a full track scholarship to the University of Georgia, where he competed in a variety of cross country and track events.

He placed fourth in the SEC Championships of 1974 and 1975 in the 600 yard dash, setting a school record of 1:11.5 that stood for many years. A summa cum laude graduate, Dr. Kremer was inducted into Phi Beta Kappa and nominated for the Rhodes Scholarship.

Upon graduation with a double major in English and History, Dr. Kremer attended the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary in Louisville, Kentucky, where he earned a Master’s of Divinity and Ph.D. in Systematic Theology. While in Louisville, Dr. Kremer ran for the Mason Dixon Athletic Club, continuing to win local and regional events while working on his Master’s. While running for the Mason Dixon AC, Dr. Kremer was part of a formidable distance medley relay team that included British Olympian Nick Rose.

Running is a Communal Endeavor


At the GoGo Running All-Area High School Banquet, Dr. Wm. Richard Kremer spoke. We thought it was so powerful that it deserved a blog post. This the second post in a series of seven. Be ready to be inspired by his words:

Second, Running is a Communal Endeavor. That’s something of a paradoxical insight, for we think of running as the ultimate individualistic enterprise, and at one level it certainly is. Yet I am glad to see this area develop a running club, for the most successful runners need other runners to bring out their best.

European runners have long had the nurture and encouragement of regional running clubs, and it is one reason why many of them have been able to sustain their careers for long periods. It is infinitely easier to climb out of that warm bed to run on a twenty-five degree morning when you know one of your teammates is waiting outside to take the run with you.

As individualistic as it might seem, running is a lifestyle that needs the nurture and encouragement of a community in order to thrive, for runners draw strength from their teammates – and from their competitors. I remember some years ago running against the defending NCAA 400 meter champion in a 600 yard indoor race. Predictably, he left me in the dust the first two hundred yards, and I spent the rest of the race catching him. But catch him I did, and once I caught people on the home stretch, most couldn’t match my kick.

But most people weren’t Evis Jennings. I ran against a number of the world’s great runners in my time, and one thing I learned – all of the great ones had an extra gear that the merely good runners lacked. Evis Jennings drew from that extra gear and bested me by a hair at the tape. I was devastated; I lost the race. Yet, the more I reflected on the race, I had tested myself more completely in that loss than in many a win. I had lost, yet I had won.

Here is what you must understand about running: ultimately, every race is against yourself. Your teammates and your competitors are necessary instruments to help you in that process of competing against yourself, and they abet the process of eliciting from you the best runner that you can be. Paradoxically, runners need community to achieve the highest rungs of their individual talents.

Running is…


Dr. Wm. Richard Kremer, is currently the pastor of Garden Lakes Baptist Church in Rome. Dr. Kremer has spent most of a lifetime involved in track and field as a participant and coach. He would characterize himself presently as a “very slow recreational runner.”

Dr. Kremer was the indoor 440 champion of the state of Alabama in 1973 and was part of the Jefferson Davis High (Montgomery, Ala.) team that finished that year undefeated. He received a full track scholarship to the University of Georgia, where he competed in a variety of cross country and track events.

He placed fourth in the SEC Championships of 1974 and 1975 in the 600 yard dash, setting a school record of 1:11.5 that stood for many years. A summa cum laude graduate, Dr. Kremer was inducted into Phi Beta Kappa and nominated for the Rhodes Scholarship.

Upon graduation with a double major in English and History, Dr. Kremer attended the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary in Louisville, Kentucky, where he earned a Master’s of Divinity and Ph.D. in Systematic Theology. While in Louisville, Dr. Kremer ran for the Mason Dixon Athletic Club, continuing to win local and regional events while working on his Master’s. While running for the Mason Dixon AC, Dr. Kremer was part of a formidable distance medley relay team that included British Olympian Nick Rose.