Marathon Training

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Marathon Training

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COMMENTS

  • By admin, July 9, 2011 @ 7:49 pm

    Great video! I am a marathoner and this really helps. Thanks

  • By Jay Stephenson, July 9, 2011 @ 7:55 pm

    This is an awesome setup. I am going to print this pdf and give it to some athletes I coach. Thanks Mike!




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Why Just Running Isn’t Enough: The Importance of Core Strength By John Peter

Part 1

Core strength is something typically overlooked in many running programs today. There seem to be two camps siding against the inclusion of core strength in training. The first are mileage purists who believe the best, and at times, the only way to improve, as a runner is to run. The second camp is more typical saying they only posses a limited amount of time for training and believe, “I’m going to use the small time I have to run as much as I can because I can get the most out of my training that way; I don’t want to waste my time doing exercises.” Part of this opinion may be from ignorance because the trend seems to be that if you ask most athletes, coaches or trainers “what is core-strength” and “why do you need it”, many of them would have trouble deciphering exactly how to answer either question. However, this is a subject that needs to be understood, as there are great implications in training and competition that stem from core-strength. These implications can lead to large scale improvements.

What is Core Strength?

To answer this, we must first understand what is the definition of the “core.” The core can be roughly defined as an area of the body that extends from the knees upwards to the bottom of the rib cage. For many people this is news as the core is typically thought of as only the abdominal muscles or the “abs.” When you look at this much larger area, we see that a very large amount of the muscles needed for running are included in this knee to rib cage section. Many of these muscles are known as stabilizer muscles.

Core strength can then be defined as strength that helps in the stabilization of the body. When thinking about what the back, abs, and hip girdle of the body do, they are the key stabilizers in any activity that involves upright movement.

 


Part 2

Why do you need it?

The human body is gifted with the ability to adapt to physical training, and it can make fairly large-scale adaptations in a short period of time to the stresses of training placed upon it. However, there is a problem with the body if these stresses are added too quickly or carelessly.

In training there is a puzzling phenomenon that occurs in which physiological fitness precedes structural readiness. In running, this means that the body’s engine (heart, lungs, etc) is ready to go fast before the frame (body) can usually handle it. This is witnessed by the numerous injuries each year in which an athlete is building their training and feels good one day so pushes a little harder than they should and suddenly has a nagging structural injury.

This is sometimes followed by a trip to a physical therapist who diagnoses the problem and usually gives some exercises to help strengthen the core where a deficiency has been detected. Core-strength is needed in training because it can help break this cycle and doing this type of training (core-strength) along with the normal running can serve as preventative training or “pre-hab” if you will. You still may get injured but this will greatly decrease those chances.

The strengthening of the core muscles, or stabilizers will also greatly aid an athlete in developing better running posture, increasing muscle power and also increasing flexibility, all of which lead to running faster. Ignoring core-strength in a training program may work in the short-term but is a recipe for long-term disaster and some may even call it irresponsible.

At the 2006 USATF Distance Podium Summit in Las Vegas, Terrence Mahon (Mammoth Lake Track Club) had this to say about core-strength. “I believe that a lack of core-strength and flexibility can create long term motor skills problems as the body continually adapts to find the path of least resistance and turns away from proper running mechanics.” Mahon’s point being that over-looking this over time will cause the body to adapt in a negative fashion that will most likely lead to injury.

How to incorporate Core Training?

The underlying fear of most coaches or athletes when looking at how to improve core strength is “how do I do it?” This is much simpler than it can first appear. At our program and with the post-collegiate athletes I work with, we include core strengthening as part of our warm-up and cool-down. The warm-up portion is at most a five-minute period of exercises called the Lunge Matrix and a series of dynamic leg movements calls Mytrle Wall Drills. A cool down could typically include a few different routines comprised of exercises geared at hitting the muscles within the core. Circuit training at times in the season will also fall into this category. Some other great exercises that are great for hitting the “core” muscles are push-ups, body planks and army crawls. Ten to fifteen minutes of core-strengthening work each day is enough for most runners to see large improvements over time. And again, this increased core-strength will lend itself to increased running economy, and muscle power which will lead to faster times.

A great resource that is very helpful for these kinds of routines is (http://gogorunning.com/video/). This link will provide videos from great coaches and athletes that will give you a large array of video routines that are great for increasing core strength, flexibility, racing, and training abilities.

 

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Solidify your run…

This is a term that I have been using to remind myself that each run needs to be solidified by a recovery element.  This is my new mantra that I hope is going to help me balance the need for recovery after hard workouts or long miles.

You can solidify your run or workout by massage, naps, hydration, eating right, ice baths, etc.  Why is there a need to solidify your workouts?

One of the problems with training hard or training at all is that our bodies don’t get faster or better when we run fast or long.  We actually get weaker and more broken down by the training that we do.  I can prove this by asking you to run a race as fast as you can and then asking you to repeat the same effort 2 hours later.  You will not be able to do it because your body is not recovered yet.  We get faster when we are sitting on the couch.

So how can we stay in a recovered state or return to a recovered state faster after a hard workout?

  1. Place equal value on recovery and hard work
  2. Be honest with yourself…are you actually recovered? Did you do the right thing to solidify your run
  3. Force yourself to take a 1-day off at least every 14 days.  Most people will need 1-day off every 3-7 days
  4. Remember that good performances come not from any individual session but from consistency
  5. A good mood is good sign of recovery…
  6. Solidifying your run can make your quality of life better…

How can you solidify your run?

  1. I have recently been solidifying my runs by 30mins naps.  In addition to the fact that the body does most of its healing during sleep I have been feeling a great deal less stressed by adding my 30min naps 3Xper week.  I just feels good to lay down and get some rest (http://gogorunning.com/the-importance-of-sleep/)
  2. Drink some chocolate milk within 20mins to 1hr after your hard workouts.  Check out this video for more on that (http://gogorunning.com/refuel-with-chocolate-milk/)
  3. Do some dynamic drills before you do a workout or race (http://gogorunning.com/running-drills/)
  4. Stretch after your run is over (http://gogorunning.com/stretching-for-runners/)
  5. Take an ice bath for 12minutes in 52-55 degree water
  6. Get a massage (http://gogorunning.com/sports-massage/)
  7. Take a leisurely walk to unwind
  8. Do some Yoga

If you are a highly motivated athlete you may have a hard time solidifying your run because you thrive on the instant gratification of hard workouts.  My suggestion is to change the way you think about getting faster.  Instead of focusing on times and splits and ignoring the recovery process try to balance your running with at least one activity that will solidify your run every day.  By focusing on both hard work and the recovery process you can solidify every run and make sure that they count.

P.S. One of my favorite quotes is from Deena Kastor.  She says “…there is no such thing as OVER TRAINING, only UNDER RESTING.”

 

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Does stretching really work?

It seems that stretching is one of the most controversial issues in athletics.  Some research suggests that static stretching is a thing of the past and that dynamic stretching should be the only type of stretching that you should do.  And then there is YOGA, which is very static “holds in various poses.”  These two seem to contradict each other.  There are several types of stretching and lots of science behind each method, but what is real goal of stretching?  Is it to get more flexible, prevent injury, or to relax? How flexible is flexible enough? Can I really prevent injury? How relaxed is relaxed enough? Is stretching going to make me faster?  What about that guy who never stretches and seems to remain injury free even though he runs 90 miles a week?

 There is a lack of understanding with what the goal of every day stretching should be.  You often hear people say things like “My flexibility is terrible.  I can’t even touch my toes.”  The problem with an arbitrary goal of touching your toes is that the ability to touch your toes does not necessarily mean that your performance is going to improve or you chance of injury will be lowered.

 I think that balance is really the key if you want to run to your potential and prevent injury.  Being balanced allows you handle equal stress on both sides of your body.  Since running is a single leg stance phase movement your weakest or least balanced side is going to limit you.

If you have one leg that has to work harder than the other because of a tight or weak muscle on that side your performance could be inhibited not because of a lack of cardio respiratory fitness, but due to mechanical stress and muscle fatigue.  So it is clear that spending some time trying to balance your body through strengthening and stretching is worthwhile, but how much time should you spend and what type of strengthening and stretching should you do?  Also, how do you balance your body?

Finding out your imbalances and what strengthening exercises you should do can be really tricky and most likely will require skilled PT, Chiro, or running analysis professional that can study your body and do some flexibility and muscle strength testing.

Recently I got certified as a Functional Movement Systems (FMS) certified exercise professional.  This certification process filled a gap in my coaching knowledge and understanding of the body.

The FMS system is not about balancing your body in a mystical or theoretical sense but rather in a mechanical sense and actual sense.   The power of this system is that you are no longer worried about isolating individual muscles and trying to get them stronger but instead you focus on movement patterns and how to improve an balance them right to left, front to back, and in every plane of motion.

To summarize:

  1. Get your body tested for balance through an FMS certified professional
  2. Balance your body through the exercises prescribed
  3. Stretch using any of the below methods to improve mobility

 Following this process will actually allow you to become more balanced, improve your flexibility, and your performance!

I am sure there are a few more types of stretching that I am not listing below but here is a fairly comprehensive list of methods of stretching methods:

  1. Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation (PNF)
  2. Static Stretching
  3. Dynamic stretching
  4. Active Isolated Stretching
  5. Yoga

If you are interested in getting screened by a FMS professional search for a professional in your area here:

http://functionalmovement.com/experts

 

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Flying/Driving Suggestions

Staying hydrated and ready to compete. Here are some tips for those of you that are flying or driving to you next big race.  I have used these tips to help keep me hydrated and ready to compete despite the fact that you have travel.

Hydration:

1)    Drink 2 cups (8oz in a cup) every 2hours

2)    Drink Sports drink, juice, as well as water (Bring an empty water bottle and fill it up once past security—liquid ban)

  1. No items are allowed in liquid form over 3oz, no aerosol cans, no razors, knife’s, or even The Stick.  If you are not sure “CHECK IT”.  Spikes are allowed, but some spike wrenches are not.

3)    Eat frequently and bring snacks for the plane.  Don’t let yourself get hypo-glycemic

4)    Na-PCA (get it at Whole foods or drug store) It holds moisture in skin and prevents dehydration.

5)    Ayr (gel or spray for your nose) Found at drug store

6)    Propel or Gatorade packets

7)    Pack 1 packet of oatmeal (they always have hot water on the plane)

Flexibiltiy and Blood flow:

1)    Abc’s while sitting every 30mins

2)    Walk every 1 hr to the bathroom (except when serving carts are out)

3)    Don’t go to the bathroom with out your shoes on (that is not water you are stepping in)

Comfort:

1)    For flights over 4 hours bring an extra change of underwear for comfort

2)    Brush your teeth for flights over 4 hours (must be 3oz or less container of toothpaste)

3)    Get some ear plugs to help with noise when sleeping

4)    Chew gum to help with pressure changes

5)    Bring you own blow up pillow or other comfort item

Time Zone Changes:

1)    0-2 hours change, Jet Lag is rarely a problem

2)    3-5 hours change West, Jet Lag is often a problem

  1. Prior to leaving shift your bedtime (BT) and waking time (WT) 1-2 hours later than usual
  2. Upon arrival start with a BT 1-2 hours earlier than usual and gradually shift towards your usual BT and WT

3)    3-5 hours change East, Jet Lag is often a problem

  1. Prior to leaving shift your bedtime (BT) and waking time (WT) 1-2 hours earlier than usual
  2. Upon arrival start with a BT 1-2 hours Later than usual and gradually shift towards your usual BT and WT

4)    6-8 hours change West, Jet Lag is often a problem

  1. A few days prior to leaving shift your bedtime (BT) and waking time (WT) 2-3 hours later than usual
  2. Upon arrival start with a BT 2-3 hours earlier than usual and gradually shift towards your usual BT and WT

5)    6-8 hours change East, Jet Lag is often a problem

  1. A few days prior to leaving shift your bedtime (BT) and waking time (WT) 2-3 hours earlier than usual
  2. Upon arrival start with a BT 2-3 hours Later than usual and gradually shift towards your usual BT and WT

 

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Running as a New Mom

By Karmen Stephenson

As a life long runner, I guess you could say that I enjoy the sport. I started running in 7th grade, continued through high school and college, and have run pretty consistently ever since. That is until my husband and I decided that we wanted to expand our family and we got pregnant with our first (and so far only) child. I was lucky and had a pretty easy pregnancy. I ran good mileage during the first trimester and then it tapered off to just walking by month 5. I was able to walk several miles daily and lift weights twice a week up to the due date.

My labor and delivery was very fast (3.5 hours total) and very painful. I also delivered my breach (frank position) baby naturally. Perhaps needless to say I had a long recovery ahead of me. I always thought that I would be the woman who was able to go for a run in just a few days after giving birth. I was wrong. I had a good bit of healing and pain to recover from and I could not walk very well for about 2 weeks. I did not go for my first run until 6 weeks after delivering my baby. It was slow, short and painful, but at least I was doing it! Since then, my training has progressed but slowly. Mothers who want to exercise have so many obstacles to overcome; work, housework, meals, taking care of their children. I am a stay at home mom who doesn’t have family close by enough to help out on a regular basis. Therefore I have had to be creative in how I get my running and other workouts done. These are just a few tips that a new mom can use to help her get back into running.

  • Listen to your body…don’t force the exercise while you are still recovering.
  • Drink LOTS of water and other fluids, especially if you are nursing your baby.
  • Start with walking if running is too painful.
  • Walk fast uphill to get your cardio up.
  • Do your core exercises and kegels!
  • Join a gym that offers child care (the YMCA is great for this).
  • Be okay with cross training: walking, swimming, pool runs, elliptical, bike.
  • Invest in a running stroller.
  • Make up a weights routine that can be done around your house or check out one of our routines here (link to video home page). If you have a baby carrier, you can even wear your baby while doing some exercises like squats and calf raises. (Of course be very careful with balance while doing these!)
  • Don’t be discouraged if you have to “start over” several times before you get into a routine…that’s what I had to do.
  • Be patient with the weight loss. If you are nursing your baby, eating relatively healthy, and doing even some regular exercise the weight will come off. I noticed that my weight was almost back to “normal” between 6-9 months.
  • Have fun doing what you love!

This is definitely not a complete list of tips, but a good start. Has anyone had a similar experience?

 

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Can I run with a cold?

by Jay Stephenson

Running while you are sick might be a bad idea.  It is difficult to know if you should go for your daily jog when you come down with a cold this winter.  One thing is for sure, you should not do a long run or a workout.  If you don’t know what a long run or a workout is then check out definition of terms blog here.

If you come down with a cold and wonder if you should continue with your daily exercise or jog the first thing to do is to consult your doctor.  Recent research seems to say that the answer is maybe…

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/10/14/phys-ed-does-exercise-boost-immunity/

According to Murphy et al “Exercise stress increases susceptibility to influenza infection” you should not consider exercising to fatigue for 2hrs if you are sick.  But I really think that everyone should know that, but on second thought there are some of you that might consider doing your Sunday Long Run even though you have been sick all week because that is what you do on Sunday, a Long Run.  There have been many Long Runs that have been squeezed in against better judgment that have resulted in more days of Cross Training on the bike or in the pool.

Another study (this is by no means an exhaustive list and is mostly an elaboration on the blog above) said that light to moderate exercise increases the immunity response by increasing the activity of the TH2 cells.  These TH2 cells decrease inflammation.  Intense exercise increases the inflammation response by activating TH1 cells.  This is why moderate to light exercise helps recovery.  Easy runs and runs under 1hr at moderate intensities need to be a part of regular training to increase TH2 cells and balance Th1 cells.

Here is my suggestion for exercise if you are felling a little under the weather.  First of all you want to see your doctor to make sure you are clear to exercise.  If you are clear then start with moderate to light exercise until you feel better.  Also, if you are feeling under the weather and you have one more workout before the big race then skip the workout, trust your fitness, and jog easy to moderate.  One more workout could be the straw that broke the camel’s back.  Here are some basic guidlines of intense, moderate, and light exercise.

Light exercise:
20-55mins @65% of HR max or under
-light jogging or walking for most people

Moderate:
20-55mins @70% to 79% of HR max
-jogging or walking where you can carry say a few sentences but not a conversation

Intense:
20mins-2hrs @80% of HR max or over
-this is fast running or intense walking, you may only be able to say a few words

 

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7 tips from a Mom with a toddler on how to get your training in.

Are you a parent with young a child who just can’t seem to get your weekly mileage in? I have a 1 ½ year old and have found that being consistent with my training is very difficult…and we all know that being consistent with your running is really what makes us better at racing. Days, weeks, months and years of consistent running. So how do I balance the huge responsibility of being mom with a toddler and get my running done? Well it hasn’t been easy, but here are several tips on how I have been able to get the mileage done.

1. Go to a gym where there is child care.
2. Ask a babysitter to meet you at the track so that you can run your workout.
3. Have a college student come to your house for an “exchange” – she babysits your child while you run and in return she gets to do her laundry for free (soap included) and you cook her a meal after you run. I try to do this for my long run once a week in the morning and then cook banana pancakes and eggs for all of us. A yummy brunch after a long run!
4. Invest in a treadmill and run while the kiddo is sleeping.
5. Invest in a jogging stroller. Take the little one with you for an easy run.
6. Ask your spouse to go with you to run at your favorite trail. Take turns running / playing with your child.
7. Ask mom or mother-in-law or another relative who wants to spend time with your child to come and watch her while you run.

Of course there are many things a parent can do to balance exercise and kids. These are just the ways that I have been able to do it. Let’s add to this list. Moms and Dads: What are some other ways that you are able to get your run in? Post a comment and let us know!

 

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Form Day

By Jay Stephenson

Running form is important.  Look at the world’s best and you will see smooth flowing forms that look effortless at very fast speeds.  Improving your form can be one of the most perplexing things for even a seasoned runner.  One of the difficulties comes with learning to change your form when you can’t see it in action.

How do you work on your form?  Recently I have devoted several days of my training specifically to form running.

Here are some recommendations for your first of many Form Days:

  1. Watch this video from “Good Form Running” and bring the PDF with you to run (or just download it on your phone).
  2. Get someone to film your running.  With the prevalence of smart phones you can watch your form and make changes.
  3. Bring some low profile shoes (a racing flat or spikes)

Ok now here is what you do:

  1. Start with the Lunge matrix see video here
  2. Review the form tips and get your posture right, find your mid foot, get your lean correct, and count your steps for the first minute of running (*180 steps/min is the goal).  Ru n for 10-20mins and count your steps for 1min every 5-10mins.
  3. After your 10-20min run switch to your flats or spikes and do 10mins of Drills video here.  Focus on finding your mid foot.
  4. Strides-practice everything you just reviewed by doing 6-10 strides of 100-200 meters with perfect form while someone is video taping you.
  5. Change back to trainer or keep spikes/flats on.  Cool Down for 10-20mins and count your steps for 1min every 5-10mins.
  6. Go home and watch your video or just view it on your phone.  (notice asymmetries of your arms and try to get them symmetrical)

Quick look at the Form day:

Lunge Matrix, Set your form, Warmup 10-20mins, change shoes, 10mins Drills, 6-10X100-200m **strides, change shoes or not, Cooldown 10-20mins, Watch video

*180 steps per minute is a marker of good cadence in running.  If you are within 5 steps per minute over or under then you are ok.

** Note that the strides and not all out sprints, but just a little faster than you normally run so that you can focus on your form.

This is a great training idea to replace the regular 50-70min easy runs that you normally do.  Not that the regular runs need to go away or that they are bad in any way.  This is just a way to still get your time in while dedicating some time to work on your form.  Doing this 1 or 2 times per week will also help you stay injury free by increasing your strength, flexibility, and efficiency.

 

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How to Make Running on a Treadmill Interesting

By Karmen Stephenson

Running on the Treadmill or the “Dreadmill” as I have heard some call it can be very boring, but we have a few things that will spice up your run indoors.

First let’s discuss the weirdo’s that actually like running inside on a treadmill.  It is the same people that run through the single track trails with ipods and read magazines on the stationary bike.  I really don’t have a problem with these people but don’t be so surprised when you get startled on the trail when you can’t hear my footsteps behind you.  Maybe you should just stay inside and leave the trail running to us…

No but seriously, if you are stuck indoors because of hot humid summers, bitterly cold winters, too little daylight, lack of childcare, or just getting it in at the gym, you may be at your wits end with indoor running. As one who has recently done much more running indoors than I would like, I know this pain all too well. Here are some things I have done to make treadmill running interesting, even on the days when I didn’t want to step on the belt.

  • Vary your speed and incline every 2 mins
  • Mimic a workout session, complete with warmup, strides, workout, and cooldown
  • Listen to music or watch TV (don’t read…you will get a headache or at least I do)
  • If you are watching a TV program, run during the program and do body weight exercises (or some other exercise) during the commercials (this works well at home…check out our core/strength training videos)
  • Get your run done on the treadmill and then go outside to do drills and strides
  • Try this workout on the treadmill for some real flavor (fundamental, special, competition hill circuits)
  • Increase the pace every 2 mins until you are sprinting and then take a break and repeat until you get the desired level of tiredness.
  • Tivo your favorite show and watch it while you run

Did we miss anything…What do you do when you are on the “Dreadmill?”

 

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How to Make Running on a Treadmill Interesting

By Jay Stephenson

Ok so here we go.  Below this paragraph you will find all lots of  info about stress fractures.  It is tedious to read but if you have a stress fracture and really want to get better you will probably read it.  One thing that you should consider looking into is seeing if your insurance will cover the Exogen “bone healing system.”  It is very pricy but I can speak from experience that it DOES get you back running faster.  A lot of businesses are covering the cost of this unit for their employees just to get them back to work faster.  You can try to buy one on ebay, but apparently it is a felony.  Something about it being a prescription item.  If you have a stress fracture and you are trying to back in shape quickly email me at coachjay@gogorunning.com.  I have a training plan called “Stress Fracture Return.”  I don’t have it up on the web yet for sale so I am offering it for free to anyone who emails me before I put it up for sale.

What is a Stress Fracture?
-Stress fractures are usually causes by repeated impact.  This is different from a complete break in a bone when the bone is completely broken with a single sudden impact.

Prevention

  • Eat Calcium and Vitamin D rich foods
  • Get a healthy amount of sunlight (if you live in a region where there is a large part of the year with no sun you may need to get some artificial sunlight in low doses)
  • Replace shoes at least every 300 miles run or every 3 to 6 months depending on activity level. If you wear the same pair of shoes every day they will not last as long as if you alternate days with multiple pairs.  Also, if you can buy one pair of shoes that is specifically designated for athletic activity then do so.
  • Do different activities on different days.  This will stress different muscle groups and different bones.  Also, if you are going to run every day then make sure you are running on soft surfaces at least 5 days a week.  One more tip is to alternate flat runs and hilly runs.  This will also help use different muscles and bones.
  • Don’t do too much too soon or go too fast too soon.  Make sure there is a gradual progression with everything you do.
  • Strength training will help to increase bone density and muscle strength.  Both of these will protect you from getting a stress fracture.
  • If you feel the same pain again then rest for 2-3 days before trying the activity again.  See you doctor.
  • The amount of calcium need for bone repair is 1000-1500 milligrams.

Symptoms

  • Pain increases with activity and throughout the day
  • Possible bruising
  • Swelling and tenderness at the site of pain

Immediate Treatment

  • If you think that you may have a stress fracture you need to stop the activity immediately and get an imaging test as soon as possible.  If you keep running or doing even easy or moderate activity you could break the bone all the way through.
  • Apply ice on the injured area for 15-20mins and elevate the injury above your heart.
  • Also, there are a few areas that you want to be careful icing due to superficial nerves.  Those areas include the inside of the ankle, the back of your knee, and the outside of your calf close to the knee.
  • Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medication may help to reduce the pain but they may also slow down the bone healing process.
  • If you suspect that you have a fracture then try not to put any weight on the injured area until you see a doctor.

Imaging Tests

  • It is very important to diagnose the injury early so that you can start treating it properly.
  • We suggest getting an MRI or a Bone scan to detect a fracture early.
  • If your doctor does not do an MRI or a bone scan then you might need to find a different doctor that is willing to get you one of those tests.
  • A simple X-Ray may not show the fracture until 6-8 weeks after the injury

Nonsurgical Treatment

  • The “Exogen bone healing system” is a low level ultrasound that cannot be duplicated by any other ultrasound machine
  • It heals fractures 38% faster
  • Heals 86% of non-unions
  • Takes 20mins a day

http://global.smith-nephew.com/us/patients/ABOUT_EXOGEN_14484.htm

  • Rest, Ice, Elevate…I don’t think compression is a good idea.
  • Crutches and removable short-leg fracture brace shoe

Surgical Treatment

  • Sometimes surgery is necessary to get the bone to heal

Start Training again

  • You need to consult your doctor before beginning a program
  • A stress fracture can take anywhere from 6 weeks to more than a year to heal all the way
  • Start with non-weight bearing activity like pool running or swimming after two weeks of complete rest
  • Transition to some biking after 4-6 weeks
  • Transition to some running and some biking after 6-8 weeks
  • Always take into account the doctor’s orders when following a training program

Link to our stress fracture recovery plan
Link to injury vids
Link to coaching site

 

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Northwest Foot and Ankle

Correct Toes

So this may seem like a paid advertisement but it is not.  I had some Plantar Fasciitis a few years ago and even learned how to spell fasciitis correctly.  In other words my feet were hurting bad.  I went to a podiatrist and he said that I should have surgery to relive the pain and when I said no to that he put me in a very uncomfortable orthotic.

After several hundred dollars later and no relief from my pain Nick Scheutze, an Olympic qualifier in the marathon told me about Correct Toes.

http://nwfootankle.com/home/toes

I got two pair, one a little bigger for me and another on that was the smaller size for my mom who was also having some foot issues.  A few weeks later after slowly introducing “Correct Toes” into my daily life and even while I was sleeping my feet stopped hurting and have not hurt since.

Now my wife and I fight over who gets to wear them.  If you have had some foot issues they are a lot cheaper of a fix than some stuff out there and these actually work.

If you get them make sure you intro them to your feel in small doses.  My feet were a little soar after wearing them only 1 hour the first day.  I think you might create another problem if you wear them too much when you first get them.

 

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Compartment Syndrome Tips from 1:52 800m runner Allen O’Neal:

Allen had the pressure test done to determine if he had compartment syndrome or not and the test was positive. He decided not to do the surgery but instead to focus on flexibility and massage to lessen the symptoms of the compartment syndrome. Here is what has been working for him…

1. Before running massage each calf for one min approximately making sure to get each one good. Do some light stretching after the massage and then do the lunge matrix.

2. If calf’s hurt during a run or workout after a rep sit on your knees and shins with tops of feet flat on the ground to stretch out. Also massage them out a little in between reps after sitting on your knees.

3. After your run massage out both calves for approximately one min within 10 mins of finishing any run.

Do each of the three steps everyday before running and after and it should help ease pain in calves. It may take a few weeks but they should start loosen up. Also think of keeping your legs relaxed as you run. Staying hydrated seems to help my calf’s to stay loose as well. When you’re hydrated the muscles can move independently and not stick together. Being dehydrated is like trying to slide down a water slide without any water. Let me know if you have any more compartment syndrome tips.

 

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Four Race day meals that will fuel your legs and calm your nerves

Have you ever wondered what to eat before you race? Here are 4 meals that will jack you up, calm your stomach, prepare you for a marathon, and satisfy your bottom line.

Jacked up:
2-3 hours before your race consume some caffeine. Just use the most common form of caffeine that you are used to (coffee, tea, 5-hour energy). Beware of Redbull, Monster or other drinks that contain lots of ingredients other than caffeine and sugar as these can make you sick before the race even begins. Some of the advantages of consuming caffeine are heightened mental focus and concentration. There have been some studies that have suggested that caffeine can also improve your muscles neuromuscular conduction.

Sensitive Stomach:
If you have a sensitive stomach you may want to avoid acidic, sugary, and fiber rich foods. My suggestion is to have 2-3 oz. of water when you wake up and 2-3 oz. of water right before the race. Also, if you are going to eat anything then make sure it’s something like a bite of white bread or a bit of a granola bar– not an orange or pastry.

Marathon:
Chances are if you are running a marathon that you will need to eat the morning before the race. If you have a sensitive stomach you may want to wake up as much as 4 hours before the race to eat. Otherwise 2-3 hours before should do. Here is my marathon meal.

1 small bowl of oatmeal (plain or with raisins)
1 slice of jelly toast (white or wheat bread)
8-10 oz. of Gatorade

This meal should provide you both with slow digesting carbs and some quick fuel to top off your glycogen stores.

On the go cheepo:
Grab a bagel and a Gatorade and head out the door while sipping and munching. This is both a cheap and effective alternative. One of my favorites is water and a banana.

 

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Four Race day meals that will fuel your legs and calm your nerves

Have you ever wondered what to eat before you race? Here are 4 meals that will jack you up, calm your stomach, prepare you for a marathon, and satisfy your bottom line.

Jacked up:
2-3 hours before your race consume some caffeine. Just use the most common form of caffeine that you are used to (coffee, tea, 5-hour energy). Beware of Redbull, Monster or other drinks that contain lots of ingredients other than caffeine and sugar as these can make you sick before the race even begins. Some of the advantages of consuming caffeine are heightened mental focus and concentration. There have been some studies that have suggested that caffeine can also improve your muscles neuromuscular conduction.

Sensitive Stomach:
If you have a sensitive stomach you may want to avoid acidic, sugary, and fiber rich foods. My suggestion is to have 2-3 oz. of water when you wake up and 2-3 oz. of water right before the race. Also, if you are going to eat anything then make sure it’s something like a bite of white bread or a bit of a granola bar– not an orange or pastry.

Marathon:
Chances are if you are running a marathon that you will need to eat the morning before the race. If you have a sensitive stomach you may want to wake up as much as 4 hours before the race to eat. Otherwise 2-3 hours before should do. Here is my marathon meal.

1 small bowl of oatmeal (plain or with raisins)
1 slice of jelly toast (white or wheat bread)
8-10 oz. of Gatorade

This meal should provide you both with slow digesting carbs and some quick fuel to top off your glycogen stores.

On the go cheepo:
Grab a bagel and a Gatorade and head out the door while sipping and munching. This is both a cheap and effective alternative. One of my favorites is water and a banana.

 

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Find your Race Weight

What to eat after an easy run, workout, or race:

One of the mistakes that some athletes make is not eating the right foods after a race or workout and eating too much after an easy run.

There is a great book call “Race Weight” by Matt Fitzgerald where he talks about finding the weight that you race the best at. In his book he talks about trying to race better by finding your best race weight. This does not mean that you starve yourself and see how much weight you can lose, but it does mean that you pay attention to your weight when you are running PR’s and feeling your best. Then write down this weight and try to hit it during your competitive season.

Fitzgerald is just pointing out the fact that extra weight can make you run slower. The other end of the spectrum is when you lose too much weight and you lose the ability to produce enough power to maintain your best racing paces.

Here is what you should consume after easy runs, workouts, and races to help you recover and not put on extra post run weight due to your eating habits.

Post easy run meal:
Water- amount depends on weather, distance covered, and thirst
1 granola bar or piece of fruit
Vitamins and mineral supplement

Post workout or race meal:
Water- amount depends on weather, distance covered, and thirst
Carb/Protein drink- 4:1 ratio of carbs to protein (Muscle milk, chocolate milk, endurox, accellerade, etc)
1 granola bar or piece of fruit
Vitamins and mineral supplement

 

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Why Are Whole Grains Good For You?

By Great Harvest Bakery Owner Carol Rutledge

There is quite a buzz these days about eating whole grains, and thankfully so. The United States Military is now serving soldiers whole grains over processed grains. Michelle Obama is advocating whole grains in the schools. Best-Selling food author Michael Pollan is telling us to eat foods closest to nature, like whole grains, because they’re healthier and tastier.

Yet, knowing which products are truly whole grain and healthy can be confusing! Especially when so many commercially produced products can contain puzzling claims.

Understanding what constitutes a whole grain product is pretty simple. The product must feature all parts of the grain – the bran, germ, and endosperm. If any of the parts are removed, so is the whole grain designation. Refined grains are those that have one or two grain parts removed, which removes naturally occurring nutrients and other healthful benefits like fiber.

The bran, the outer most layer of a grain kernel, is where the fiber comes from along with some vitamins and minerals. The endosperm of a grain is mainly the carbohydrate source. It contains good things like trace proteins, vitamins and minerals. The germ of the kernel is a nutrient powerhouse because it contains good fats and vitamins, especially B and E, and minerals.

Whole grains are good for you. The Dietary Guidelines for Americans by MyPyramid (the FDA food) recommends three or more servings a day. Why? Because whole grains among other things, have been shown to reduce the risk of heart disease, type 2 diabetes, strokes and certain types of cancers. Whole grains are also great for weight management because they provide a consistent source of energy and help you stay fuller longer.

The essential vitamins found in whole grains include iron, zinc, potassium, magnesium, folic acid, and many B-vitamins. Surprising but true- whole grains from wheat and oats are equal in antioxidant activity to spinach and broccoli! Plus, carbohydrates are the only source of energy for your red blood cells and are a main source of energy for the brain and central nervous system. This is particularly important during pregnancy. Also, children who eat more whole grains reduce their risk of obesity, diabetes and asthma.

The big picture for good health is to remember that a diet rich in whole natural foods, such as whole grains, fresh vegetables and fruits is rich in vitamins, fiber, minerals and antioxidants, which are essential to your health and lifestyle. The key is to eat delicious, nutritious foods closest to nature – like whole grains.

 

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Runners Nutrition Part 1:

By Great Harvest Bakery Owner Carol Rutledge

By Jay Stephenson

I recently read an article about lower leg pain being caused by too few calories in diets of collegiate distance runners.  In a study with 76 collegiate female athletes there was a higher incidence of lower leg pain, missed practices, and stress fractures in athletes that had abnormal eating patterns.  Abnormal eating patterns were defined as missing meals, eating lower calories than consumed by more than 3,500 kcal per week, binge eating, and purging.

As a male collegiate, post collegiate, and now coach I have tried to see what the best race weights for my athletes and myself are for several years.  The conclusion that I have come to is that athletes need to be at the weight that they stay the healthiest for the longest period of time.

You may be able to run faster in the short term by lowering you body weight through an abnormal eating pattern but it will not be without it’s risks of injury.  The problem is that your body structure will not maintain strength when you limit your food intake beyond a certain point.  You will begin to lose some weight that is muscle mass due to your body consuming some of the protein in the muscles for energy.

Your body was made to survive and it will survive by consuming whatever is present.  If you don’t have enough carbohydrate and fats in your diet your body will begin to eat away at your muscle mass to fuel your running and daily activities.  The bottom line here is try to eat good food and a lot of it.  Check out part 2 of this nutrition blog to see how you should approach your eating attitude.

 

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Runners Nutrition Part 2

By Jay Stephenson

References:

“Exercise Physiology,” Powers and Howley 331

“Better Training for Distance Runners,” Martin and Coe

The first step to “Good” Nutrition is focusing on what foods you need for optimal performance instead of focusing on what foods to avoid.  The common assumption that American endurance athletes make is that if they avoid the foods that could harm performance that they will inherently gain the foods that will improve performance.  This assumption is flawed for many reasons.  One example is the common avoidance of saturated fats by many endurance athletes that has lead to a depletion of iron stores as a result of avoiding the consumption of red meats.

To learn what an endurance athlete needs to eat in order to maximize performance we will focus on two primary objectives in the form of questions:

  1. What am I consuming?
  2. Why should I consume it?

1. What am I consuming?  NUTRIENTS

There are six classes of nutrients: water, vitamins, minerals, carbohydrates, fats, and proteins.  In the following sections each nutrient will be described briefly and the primary food sources of each will be identified.  Also within each section, a brief suggestion of when to consume each nutrient will be given.

__________________________________________________________________

include everything above this line in each of the blog series from #2 on

1. What am I consuming?  WATER

The body is 50% to 75% water, depending on age and body fatness.  A loss of only 3% to 4% of body water aversely affects aerobic performance.  Water is lost primarily through sweat, urine, respiration, and cell activity.

2. Why should I consume it?  WATER

Deena Kastor, the American record holder in the marathon, says that one of the keys to her performance is drinking 1 Gallon of water per day.  Optimal consumption of water comes within 30min after training sessions are completed and during training sessions of over 1hr 30min.  You will often hear a recommended amount of ounces per distance or time.  The troubles with these formulas are that often athletes do not take the time to remember the amount or timing of such formulas.  Also, in December because of the temperature being cooler you will need less water than in August when it is hot.  I suggest that you drink within 30min after your training session until you are no longer thirsty and then drink a little more.  Think of it in terms of drinking the amount of water you lost plus a little more for cell adaptation to occur.

Runners Nutrition Part 3

By Jay Stephenson

1. What am I consuming? Vitamins

Vitamins are needed in small amounts and are not “used up” in the metabolic reactions.  However they are degraded like any biological molecule and must be replaced on a regular basis to maintain body stores.  Vitamins exist in two forms: Fat-Soluble and Water-Soluble.  Vitamins taken in excess can lead to toxicity.

Fat-Soluble vitamins include A, D, E and K.  These vitamins can be stored in large quantities in the body; thus a deficiency state takes longer to develop than for water-soluble vitamins.

Water-Soluble vitamins include C, the B vitamins: thiamin (B-1), riboflavin (B-2), niacin, pyridoxine (B-6), folic acid, B-12, pantothenic acid, and biotin.  Most are involved in energy metabolism.  Vitamin C is involved in the maintenance of bone, cartilage, and connective tissue.

2. Why should I consume it? Vitamins-

The most important vitamins for elite endurance athletes are Vitamin C found in citrus fruits, strawberries, broccoli, greens (Vitamin C helps with connective tissue synthesis, hormone synthesis, and neurotransmitter synthesis), Vitamin B-12 found in animal foods, oysters, and clams (B-12 helps with folate metabolism and nerve function), Thiamin found in sunflower seeds, pork, whole and enriched grains, dried beans, peas, brewers yeast (Thiamin is involved in carbohydrate metabolism and nerve function), Riboflavin found in milk, mushrooms, spinach, liver, enriched grains (Riboflavin is involved in energy metabolism), Niacin found in mushrooms, bran, tuna, salmon, chicken, beef, liver, peanuts, enriched grains), Pantothenic acid found in mushrooms, liver, broccoli, eggs (Pantothenic acid is involved in energy metabolism, fat synthesis, fat breakdown), Biotin found in cheese, egg yolks, cauliflower, peanut butter, liver (Biotin is involved in glucose production and fat synthesis) Vitamin B-6 found in animal protein foods, spinach, broccoli, bananas, salmon, sunflower seeds (Vitamin B-6 is involved in protein metabolism, neurotransmitter synthesis, hemoglobin synthesis), Vitamin D found in fortified milk, fish oils, and breakfast cereals (Vitamin D facilitates absorption of calcium and phosphorus and maintains optimal calcification of bone), Vitamin K found in green vegetables and liver (Vitamin K help form prothromibin and other factors for blood clotting and contribute to bon metabolism).   

Runners Nutrition Part 4

By Jay Stephenson

1. What am I consuming? Minerals

Minerals are the chemical elements other than carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen, associated with the structure of the body.  There are many minerals the body needs but calcium, iron, and sodium seem to be the most relevant in terms of deficiencies and toxicity.  Like vitamins some minerals taken in excess can be toxic (iron, zinc).

Calcium-(Ca++) and phosphorus combine with organic molecules to form the teeth and bones.  The bones are a “store” of calcium that helps to  maintain the plasma Ca++ concentration when dietary intake is inadequate.  Bone is constantly turning over its calcium and phosphorus, so diet must replace what is lost.  If the diet is deficient in calcium for a long period of time, loss of bone, osteoporosis, or stress fracture can occur.

2. Why should I consume it?  Minerals- 

Iron- Of all substances in metabolism that contribute to the beneficial adaptations seen with endurance training, a powerful case could be made for iron as the most critical for at least four reasons:

  1. Hemoglobin fills about one third the volume of each red blood cell, so an increase in red cell mass results in an increased total hemoglobin.  Without iron, hemoglobin cannot be manufactured.  An increase in cell mass means that the rate of production of red blood cells must be stepped up in endurance-trained athletes.  In untrained people, typical dynamics of the red blood cell synthesis-breakdown continuum are such that about 233million cells are released from the bone marrow into the blood stream each second, with an equal number destroyed (Cronkite 1973).  This number is larger in trained athletes because of an increased production of cells to meet the increased destruction of cells.
  2. A red blood cell has no nucleus and thus divides no further, but all its precursor cells do and this cellular division requires DNA synthesis, which is impossible without iron
  3. Endurance training is characterized among other things by an increased myoglobin content in skeletal muscle.  Myoglobin contains iron; limitations in iron supply should reduce its availability as an oxygen storage reservoir in skeletal muscle.
  4. Krebs cycle enzymes, more than half of which contain iron, which allow eventual interaction of 02 and H+ to form H20, completing the large-scale energy release to form FUEL BREAKDOWN (eg energy)(“Better Training For Distance Runners”, Martin and Coe).

Runners Nutrition Part 5

By Jay Stephenson

1. What am I consuming? Carbohydrates-

Carbohydrates can be divided into two classes, those that can be digested and metabolized for energy (sugars and starches), and those that are indigestible (fiber).  The sugars are found in jellies, jams, fruits, soft drinks, honey, syrups, and milk while the starches are found in cereals, flour, potatoes and other vegetables.  Fiber is found in vegetables, various fruits, breads, cereals, pasta, and rice.

Sugars and starches-

Carbohydrate is a major energy source for all tissues and crucial source for two: red blood cells and neurons.  The red blood cells depend exclusively on anaerobic gylcolysis for energy, and the nervous system functions well only on carbohydrate.  Carbohydrates exist in three forms: mononsaccharides, disaccharides and polysaccharides.  Monosaccharides are simple sugars and are found in fruits, honey, sports drinks, etc.  Disaccharides are formed by combining two monosaccharide.  For example, table sugar is called sucrose and is composed of glucose and fructose.  Sucrose is the most common disaccharide and is found in cane sugar, beets, honey, sports drinks, and maple syrup.  Polysaccharides are complex carbohydrates that contain three or more monosaccharides.  Polysaccharides can contain anywhere from three monosaccharides to several hundred.  The most usable form of polysaccharide is found in starch from corn, grains, beans , potatoes, and peas.  After ingestion starch is broken down to form monosaccharides and may be used as energy immediately by cells or stored in another form within cells for future energy needs.  Glycogen is the term used for the polysaccharide stored in animal tissue.  It is synthesized within cells by linking glucose molecules together.  Glycogen molecules are generally large and can consist of hundreds to thousands of glucose molecules.  Cells store glycogen as a means of supplying carbohydrates as an energy source.  

2. Why should I consume it?  Carbohydrates-

During exercise individual muscle cells break down glycogen into glucose (glycogenolysis) and use it as a source of energy for contraction.  This also occurs in the liver as glucose is released into the blood stream.  Glycogen is stored in the muscle fibers and in the liver.  Total glycogen stores are relatively small and can be depleted in a few hours of prolonged running.  Therefore, glycogen synthesis is an ongoing process within cells.  Diets low in carbohydrates tend to hamper glycogen synthesis, while high-carbohydrate diets enhance glycogen synthesis.  Insufficient glycogen stores will result in a decrease in energy efficiency and eventually energy depletion and a loss of willingness of the athlete to continue exercise.  Replenishing carbohydrates within a 30 min window after to depletion will allow for super-carbohydrate-absorption.  After this 30 min window absorption ability begins to decrease.

Runners Nutrition Part 6

By Jay Stephenson

1. What am I consuming? Fats

Fats are essential for energy production, absorption of fat-soluble vitamins, cell membrane structure, hormone synthesis, insulation, and the protection of vital organs.

We will discuss the two categories of fats in terms of their cholesterol concentration.  Low-density lipoproteins (LDL) carry more cholesterol than high-density lipoproteins (HDL).  High levels of LDL cholesterol are directly related to cardiovascular risk while high levels of HDL cholesterol offer protection from heart disease.  The concentration of HDL cholesterol is influenced by heredity, gender, exercise, and diet.  Diets high in saturated fats increase LDL cholesterol.  A reduction in the sources of saturated fats including meats, animal fat, palm oil, coconut oil, hydrogenated shortenings, whole milk, cream, butter, ice cream, and cheese will reduce LDL cholesterol.

2. Why should I consume it?  Fats-

Current dietary practices for elite runners in many parts of the world, as well as for much of American society, emphasize low saturated fats and cholesterol, which imply a minimum of red meat intake, and a greater emphasis on vegetable protein and complex carbohydrates.  For athletes scheduling two training sessions per day and who require a high-energy intake that can be assimilated easily and quickly, such emphasis is useful.  However, this diet is likely to have a lowered iron content among other essential vitamins and minerals.  Including a reduction of the muscle repairing nutrient, protein.

For endurance athletes animal foods are essential.  It is easy to find several sources of animal foods without high fat content.  Lean red meat, poultry, pork, liver, milk, ostrich, turkey, and fish are excellent sources of the nutrients needed for endurance athletes.

Runners Nutrition Part 7

By Jay Stephenson

1. What am I consuming? Protein-

Protein contains 9 essential amino acids, without which the body cannot synthesize all the proteins needed for tissues, enzymes, and hormones.  The quality of protein in a diet is based on how well these essential amino acids are represented.  In terms of quality, the best sources of protein are eggs, milk, and fish, with good sources being meat, poultry, cheese, and soybeans.  Fair sources include grains, vegetables, seeds, and nuts, and other legumes.

2. Why should I consume it?  Protein

Depending on the point in the training program athletes may require more protein.  For endurance athletes during adaptation to new or increasingly strenuous exercise (e.g. after a hard workout) protein requirements will be higher.

There is a small concern about consuming too much protein in large doses of individual amino acid supplements but not from consuming animal foods.

Conclusion:

Strive to get what you need for your body to operate optimally.  Use this guide.  Remember that a loss of 3%-4% of WATER aversely effects aerobic performance so you must replenish it, VITAMINS are necessary for cell activity, IRON must be present for adaptation, CARBOHYDRATES help energize your body in prep for performance, FATS are essential for energy production and iron absorption, and PROTEIN allows your body to reap the benefits of exercise by rebuilding your muscle tissue.

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Hydration Tips

Recently one of the athletes that I coach asked me how she could stay hydrated during the hot summer months.  Here are 4 tips that are out of the box and 4 in the box tips to keep you hydrated.

Out of the box:

  1. Don’t forget to drink first thing in the morning as soon as you wake up…even a few sips of water will help you start your day off on the right foot.
  2. Eat more foods that have a lot of water in them.   I was recently at a cookout and they had brownies and watermelon.  While the natural response is to eat some of both make sure you focus on the watermelon.
  3. Keep your water bottle with you all day.  You will be surprised how much you will drink if water is accessible all day.  Put some flavoring in it if it motivates you to drink more.
  4. Suck on some ice– don’t crunch it because it’s bad for your teeth.

In the box:

  1. Drink during exercise if it is over 1hr in duration
  2. Drink before/after and during exercise
  3. Include carbohydrate drink before and during
  4. After a workout consume a 4:1 carb to protein ratio drink (This ratio has been shown to speed up recovery time after hard workouts).  Great carb/protein drinks are chocolate milk, muscle milk, Hammer nutrition products, or whatever is handy.

Good luck staying hydrated!

 

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The last week before a Marathon:

Training properly during the final before a Marathon can make or break your race.  Often the thing that will break you is too much training in the final week and going into the marathon slightly “over-trained.”

“There is no such thing as over-training, only under-resting”

-Deen Kastor, US Women’s Marathon Record Holder

I agree with Deena that focusing on being well rested should be a major focus for a Marathon runner.  At first glance “over-training” and “under-resting” seem like two ways of saying the same thing.   However, they are two very different ways of thinking.   Saying that you are “over-trained” gives the impression that you need to train less, which might be a problem if you are trying to run a faster Marathon.  Using the terminology of “under-rested” will encourage you to find ways to recover better and solidify (check out my blog on how to solidify your runs) your hard workouts and runs.

Our goal is not avoid “over-training” but instead focus on recovery and making sure you are not “under-rested.”  This is particularly true in the final week before a Marathon.

I have detailed the final week before one of my athlete’s training.  She had been running 80-99 miles per week in her marathon buildup with 1 day off every 14.  I detailed the focus of each day along with a few tips for the final week.

Tips (just a few tips as they relate to recovery):

-Sleep no less than 8 hrs every night the week of the Marathon

-Make sure that you do some light stretching after your runs in the final days

Justyna Mudy Dec 4. – Dec 10. 2011

Sunday: Mini Long Run with Drinking practice and mental preparation

7:30am, LUNGE MATRIX, 1hr 30mins @Zone 1 to Zone 2 (progressing from 7:30pace to 6:50pace), light stretching

Monday: Recovery Day                                                                                          7:30am, LUNGE MATRIX, 1hr @Zone 0 to Zone 1 (easy jogging at 7:30pace), a few drills and dynamic stretching

Tuesday: Pre-Marathon Workout just to get the kinks out.  Note: don’t worry if you don’t feel that good on this one.  I have found that how you feel 4 days before the Marathon doesn’t mean much.

7:30am, LUNGE MATRIX, WORKOUT WARMUP, 2miles @ goal Marathon pace (12:10, 6:05pace), 3mins rec, 6X400m @5k Race Pace with 1min rec (76-79 per 400m), WORKOUT COOLDOWN

4:00pm, 40mins @Zone 0 to Zone 1 (easy jogging at 7:30pace), light stretching

Wednesday: Recovery Day

7:30am, LUNGE MATRIX, 1hr @Zone 0 to Zone 1 (easy jogging at 7:30pace), a few drills and dynamic stretching

4:00pm, 40mins @Zone 0 to Zone 1 (easy jogging at 7:30pace), light stretching.

Thursday: Focus on Form Day and getting your muscle fibers firing properly

7:30am, LUNGE MATRIX, 40mins @Zone 0 to Zone 1 (easy jogging at 8:00pace), a few drills and dynamic stretching, 4X100m hill sprint @80% of Max effort, 30mins @Zone 0 to Zone 1 (easy jogging at 7:30pace) light stretching and light medball routine

Friday: Recovery Day, You can do some light strides (4X) here if you need to, but it is not necessary unless you need it to relax.

7:30am, ½ OF THE LUNGE MATRIX, 30mins @Zone 0 to Zone 1 (easy jogging at 8:00pace), light stretching after

Saturday: Race Day, 10mins easy jogging to warm-up with a stride or two and a few drills.  The Marathon warm-up is highly specific to each person’s needs.

Race Day

Total Miles: 65-70.  This is 75-77% of the weekly mileage that was run in the buildup period to the marathon.  There was a very heavy focus on recovery through 3 ice bath’s, 2 massages, stretching, focusing on form, sleeping 8+ hours at night and taking 1hr naps most days.

Marathon Time: 2:42:05

Splits: 6:14, 6:22, 6:15, 6:11, 6:19, 6:22, 6:21, 6:22, 6:24, 6:21, 6:23, 6:22, 6:29, 6:11, 5:49 (broke away from the pack), 5:52, 5:55, 5:58, 5:58, 5:59, 6:05, 5:59, 5:56, 6:02, 6:01, 6:00, 1:58 (for .35)

 

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Half-Marathon Workouts and how to progress them…

I have studied the half-marathon through several avenues.  One of the most helpful has been the conversations and emails that I have sent back and forth with Arthur Lydiard in 2001 and more recently with Renato Canova in 2010 (I have only had a few conversations and emails with Renato, but I have followed him on letsrun.com for several years).  A lot of my terminology and workouts are from Renato Canova.

First I want to say that there are too many different terminologies out there in the coaching world that describe the same thing and that we do need to talk about the different wording and make sure we are on the same page.  I have listened to coaches say the same things using different words and not understand each other due to one person using the word “tempo” and the other using the word “Lactate Threshold.”  If you have a question about a term then please ask.  Italian Coach, Renato Canova has shaped a lot of my thinking.  Renato knows that I have adopted his philosophy and he is helping me further develop it.  In my opinion he is the greatest coach in the world!

The greatest determinate of POTENTIAL is basic speed and speed endurance in the endurance events.  The greatest determinate of PERFORMANCE is your lactate processing system (Aerobic Threshold, Anaerobic Threshold, Maximum Lactate Steady State, Lactate Tolerance).  Improving performance in the endurance events is related to the VOLUME and the INTENSITY that the athlete is able to train at while managing the stress and recovery process.  The first thing that we must do is build volume and intensity together.  Too many coaches focus on one or the other but to properly develop the athlete to their POTENTIAL it is necessary to improve speed endurance and maintain or improve basic speed (depending on the event and the speed required for that event) while building VOLUME and INTENSITY that is specific to their race.

I have sectioned the workouts into Fundamental, Special, and Specific training.

Fundamental is training that is very basic and not specific to the event you are training for but allows you to lay a base of basic fitness for workout that are more specific later in the training program.  It is important to note that there is always some training that is specific to the goal race in each phase of training.  The best way to explain each phase is to say that the name of the phase simply describes the primary goal of the phase.

Special training is characterized by shorter intervals (400’s-800’s @ a pace faster than goal race pace) or longer intervals (1k’s to 3k’s @ a pace slower than goal race pace).  Typically special workouts have less recovery time between intervals than the specific.

Specific training is characterized by longer intervals at or above race pace with longer recoveries.  You can simply take the workouts from the Special period and extend them. For example instead of doing 10X800m @102% of race pace w/2’ recovery you extend the workout to do 6X1k @102% of race pace w/2’ recovery.

Also, there is General training which is training that is not related specifically to the sport of running.  I would put exercises, drills, cross training, etc into this category.  I use this often for recovery or for extra volume when running might not fit into the training program.

Since this blog is about the training for half-marathon I have detailed workouts that you can use for the half below.  A lot of these workouts are ones that I have studied and used with my athletes from years of following Renato Canova.  The workouts are not meant to be simply copied for every athlete but by looking at the workouts I think you can begin to see the progression and from that you can learn to adapt your workouts to specific athletes needs.  Always you will need to make an adjustment in volumes for different athletes ages or progress levels but the same principles still remain.

Also, I use the term WORKOUT WARMUP and WORKOUT COOLDOWN in the workouts below.  You can view a full WORKOUT WARMUP and WORKOUT COOLDOWN at www.gogorunning.com.

General:

Cross training, other sports, exercises, drills, agility, or other training that allows you the base to complete the Fundamental workouts.

Fundamental:

Threshold Running:

WORKOUT WARMUP, 8K-20K Progression from Aerobic Threshold to Anaerobic Threshold (I call this Zone 2 to Zone 3 and even to 100% of 10k Race Pace, see the pacing calculator here).

Easy running:

This could fall into the General category

Long Runs:

Progressing all season with the following example of progression.  Running 1 long run per week.  Also, I think that the world of Marathon Running has been most influenced by the progression of quality long runs.  You can think of the long runs as easy for a very young athlete and then as the athlete gets older you will want to progress the long runs in volume and intensity.  I like to build the long run in volume and then start rotating weeks between 2hrs and 90mins where the 2hrs steadily introduces more of the long run at Zone 2 until you are doing 3miles easy jogging, 12miles @Zone 2, 2-3miles easy jogging and then the 90mins progresses from Zone 1 to Zone 2.5 progressing slowly the entire run.  The 90mins sometimes goes to Zone 3 if the athlete is “feeling good.”  Below is an example of 11 weeks progression of the Long Run.

40mins, 70mins, 90mins, 1h 40mins, 1hr 50mins, 2hrs, 90mins, 2hrs, 90mins, 2hrs, 90mins

Also, cross training, or other training that allows you the base to complete the Special workouts can fall into this category.

Long intervals ca go here too like the one below:

WORKOUT WARMUP, 3000m + 2X2000m + 5X1000m + 6X500m w/3′ after 3k and 2k, 2′ after 1k, 1’30” after 500, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

Any Fartlek workouts can be considered Fundamental as well.

Special:

1hr WARMUP, 12 miles of 1mile @ 100% of Mar Pace / 800m @Z2 , 10mins COOLDOWN

WORKOUT WARMUP, 12X1000m w/2′ rec @105% of Half Mar RP, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

WORKOUT WARMUP, 25X600m w/1′ rec @105% of Half Mar RP or faster, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

WORKOUT WARMUP, 6X2k w/2′ to 3′ rec @102 to 105% of Half Mar RP, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

WORKOUT WARMUP, 9X1mile w/3′ rec @102% RP to 105% of Half Mar RP, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

LUNGE MATRIX, 1hr TOTAL @Z0 to Z2, Drills, 4X200m Strides, 1600m/1200m/800m/400m/200m @100% of 5k RP for the 1600m and 1200m, 100% of 3k RP for 800m, 100% of 1500m RP for 400m and 200m, 10mins cool down

WORKOUT WARMUP, 3000m + 1X2000m + 4X1000m + 4X500m w/3′ after 3k and 2k, 2′ after 1k, 1’30” after 500 @102% of Half Mar RP for 3k and 2k, 105% of Half Mar RP or faster for 1k’s and 500’s, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

Specific:

WORKOUT WARMUP, 2mile @ 100% of Half Mar RP, 3′ recovery, 2X(1mie @ 100% of 10k RP, 1’30” rec, 1mile @ 100% of Half Mar RP, 3′ rec), WORKOUT COOLDOWN

WORKOUT WARMUP, 2mile @ 100% of Half Mar RP, 3′ recovery, 3X(1mile @ 100% of 10k RP, 1’30” rec, 1mile @ 100% of Half Mar RP, 3′ rec), WORKOUT COOLDOWN

WORKOUT WARMUP, 15k Continuous @102% Half Mar RP, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

WORKOUT WARMUP, 25k @97% of Half Mar RP, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

WORKOUT WARMUP, 3mile /2mile/ 1mile @102-105% Half Mar RP w/800m recovery in Z1.5 , WORKOUT COOLDOWN

WORKOUT WARMUP, 3X2mile @102-105% Half Mar RP w/800m recovery in Z1.5 , WORKOUT COOLDOWN

WORKOUT WARMUP, 3X3mile @102-105% Half Mar RP w/800m recovery in Z1.5 , WORKOUT COOLDOWN

WORKOUT WARMUP, 4X5k w/1000 in Z1.5 @102-105% Half Mar RP, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

WORKOUT WARMUP, 5X3k w/1000 in Z1.5 @102-105% Half Mar RP, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

WORKOUT WARMUP, 7X2k w/ 400 rec in 2′ @102-105% Half Mar RP, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

WORKOUT WARMUP, 4miles Tempo @ Z2, 3mins rec, + 4X2′-ON/2′-OFF @100% of 10k RP, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

RACE WARMUP, Race Half Marathon, RACE COOLDOWN

 

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Running Is…

I stand before you tonight feeling a great sense of privilege and some small envy.  I feel privileged to address a collection of young runners, many of you at the very beginning of your running careers.  I feel a twinge of envy because I can never stand again where you stand, with healthy joints, trim bodies, and the possibility of improving your time every day, able to embrace the challenge of getting a little faster and stronger with each passing week.  I once stood where you stand and know from the vantage point of hindsight what a privileged position you enjoy.  I can never stand in your place again; however, from the vantage point of a long running pilgrimage I can share with you briefly seven truths that I’ve gleaned under the heading, “Running Is . . .”

First, you need to know, Running Is not a sport;  Running is a Lifestyle.  Running encompasses every aspect of your being — what you eat, what you drink, how much you sleep, how you arrange your life, how you spend your time.  Running is a lifestyle that demands you embrace a disciplined approach to everything you do,   because everything you do affects your effectiveness as a runner. Everything you do shows up with some immediacy on the track or during a road race – -and no other sport is quite like running in this regard.  Running is a lifestyle that ceaselessly tests your commitment, your discipline, and ultimately your character.  Many years ago a famous running shoe company had an advertisement in a track magazine that showed a runner snugly ensconced in his bed on a dark morning.  His 5:15 am alarm was flashing.  But he could tell from the frost on his windows that the weather outside was frigid.  His running clothes and new running shoes were on a stand a few feet away from him, and the caption read, “Our track shoes can’t help you take the hardest step.”  It’s that hardest step, that step out of the warmth of that bed and into those shoes and out of those warm doors into the frigid darkness that tests how committed you are to what you do.  The fact you met the challenge yesterday or the day before that, does not determine how you will meet the challenge today.   Yet it is rising to the call of such challenges that make running a measure of the whole of your being, a lifestyle that daily fathoms your character.   I say again, Running is not a sport, it is a lifestyle.

Second,  Running Is a Communal Endeavor.  That’s something of a paradoxical insight, for we think of running as the ultimate individualistic enterprise, and at one level it certainly is. Yet I am glad to see this area develop a running club, for the most successful runners need other runners to bring out their best.  European runners have long had the nurture and encouragement of regional running clubs, and it is one reason why many of them have been able to sustain their careers for long periods.  It is infinitely easier to climb out of that warm bed to run on a twenty-five degree morning when you know one of your teammates is waiting outside to take the run with you.  As individualistic as it might seem, running is a lifestyle that needs the nurture and encouragement of a community in order to thrive, for runners draw strength from their teammates – and from their competitors.  I remember some years ago running against the defending NCAA 400 meter champion in a 600 yard indoor race.  Predictably, he left me in the dust the first two hundred yards, and I spent the rest of the race catching him.  But catch him I did, and once I caught people on the home stretch, most couldn’t match my kick.  But most people weren’t Evis Jennings.  I ran against a number of the world’s great runners in my time, and one thing I learned – all of the great ones had an extra gear that the merely good runners lacked.  Evis Jennings drew from that extra gear and bested me by a hair at the tape.  I was devastated; I lost the race.  Yet, the more I reflected on the race, I had tested myself more completely in that loss than in many a win.  I had lost, yet I had won.   Here is what you must understand about running:  ultimately, every race is against yourself.  Your teammates and your competitors are necessary instruments to help you in that process of competing against yourself, and they abet the process of eliciting from you the best runner that you can be.   Paradoxically, runners need community to achieve the highest rungs of their individual talents.

Third, Running Is no respecter of origins. I say that because many runners labor under an inferiority complex. Oh, they think, I run for a small school, or I’m from a small town, or I’m not very well known among the highly-touted runners of the state, or I don’t have access to the best training techniques or facilities.  Listen, speed can come from anywhere.  Stamina knows no area code.  You may be a small town kid, but that doesn’t mean you don’t have big-time talent.  I remember well a cold, blustery March day in 1976 when I was starting my outdoor season at some podunk track amidst an insignificant event known as the Morehouse Relays, held at tiny Morehouse College in Atlanta.  I happened to look up during the 400 meter intermediate hurdles and saw this tall, gawky black kid clearing the hurdles somewhat awkwardly down the backstretch – awkwardly, but with plenty of raw speed in between barriers.   This tall, gawky unknown black kid won the race handily – and he kept winning every race I saw him run that year, including the Olympic gold medal.  His name?  Edwin Moses, who went on to become one of the most dominant runners the track world has ever seen.   No matter who you are or where you’re from, speed can come from anywhere – for Running is no respecter of origins.

Fourth, Running Is a Gift to be Enjoyed in its Many Stages.  Perhaps the best way I can explain this point is by noting the name that a friend of mine gave his running shoe store.  He called it “Jogger, Runner, Racer.”  Most of you are at the Racer stage of your careers.   Respect the privilege that you have and do your utmost to maximize your talent.  But understand that your racing career represents but a fraction of your running pilgrimage.   I raced competitively for about twenty years, until the press of church work and academics forced me to surrender the racing life.  But that didn’t mean I had to give up running.  It has remained a part of my lifestyle, an essential component of my being.  I call myself a runner, even though what I call running now is what I would have called jogging ten years ago.  But that doesn’t mean I can’t continue the sense of being “in training”; that doesn’t meant I can’t continue to compete against myself – and test myself in the process.  You are at a privileged stage in your running pilgrimage: make the most of it.  But know that this is a lifestyle you can continue to enjoy and can continue to shape and improve your life even after your racing days are over. Running is a gift to be enjoyed in its many stages.

Fifth, Running Is a discipline whose virtues carry over into every aspect of your life.  It is not only true that everything you do affects your running; your running affects everything you do.  Running teaches you to distinguish between “wishing” and “wanting.” Lots of people “wish” they could do their best, but they aren’t wiling to make the lifestyle changes necessary to turn their wishes into reality.  Running is about setting goals and wanting those goals so passionately that you make the sacrifices necessary to attain them.  Even when you don’t attain your goals, the experience of chasing them empowers you.  All of life is about distinguishing “wishing” from “wanting,” and the skill set and attitudes you develop in pursuing those goals you truly want in track and cross country are the same skill set and attitudes that will empower you to move beyond wishing to achieve those goals you truly want to attain in every ambit of your career.

Sixth, Running Is a Mystery to be Enjoyed.  I speak as a former racer to present racers:  there is not always a direct correlation between what you put into your sport and what you get out of it.   That can be a frustrating reality – but it is reality.  You can train perfectly for a race, can discipline yourself intensely, then go out and run a horrible race.   Or you can go through a period where injury and circumstance prevent you from preparing as you would like, only to then go out and breeze through a personal best.  This is true of running at every level.  When I was competing in middle distances there was a brilliant British half-miler named Sebastian Coe who won the gold medal in the 800 meter at the 1980 Olympic Games.  Yet Sebastian Coe once said, “You know, my goal is to put my foot on the pedal with three hundred meters to go.  Sometimes there is gas in the tank, sometimes there is not.  I never know when the gas will be there and when it won’t.” That’s a world class runner talking, and his quote simply underscores my point: the mystery as to why our bodies do what they do can never be fully explained.   You just have to accept and enjoy the fact that running is a mystery to be enjoyed.

Seventh and finally, Running ultimately does not build character but reveal it.  Running is ultimately an expression of our spirit.  Regardless of how the external world measures wins and losses, we know from the inside that how we close that last hundred yards, how we attack that last high hill, how we respond when the guy or girl in front of us ups the pace — those challenges attest to the vitality and mettle of our inner being.   I suppose most of you are too young to remember the movie “Chariots of Fire,”  but I encourage you to rent it for an evening sometime soon.  One of the runners featured in that movie was a Scottish Christian named Eric Liddell, the son of British missionaries to China who returned to Britain for his education and became one of the most celebrated runners in the world.  Eric Liddell was questioned as to how he balanced his Christian faith and his running passion, and he answered, “I believe God made me for a purpose.  But he also made me fast and when I run I feel His pleasure.”  Liddell refused to run his specialty, the 100 meter, at the 1924 Olympic Games because its preliminaries were held on a Sunday, and he didn’t compete on a Sunday for religious reasons.  Instead, he entered the 400 meter dash and won the gold. That’s where the movie ends.  But, as the old commentator Paul Harvey used to say – “Here’s the rest of the story.”   Having gained world-wide fame, with a life of celebrity and riches offered to him, Eric Liddell returned to China as a missionary, where he was eventually imprisoned in a concentration camp by the Japanese during World War II.   I came across the testimony of a young girl who was also in that same camp, and she testified to meeting this Christian leader that all the kids called ‘Uncle Eric,” who kept improvising games to keep the kids’ spirits up.   She said she and the other kids knew in a vague way that “Uncle Eric” was famous, but they didn’t know why.  But they knew this: his enthusiasm and joyous spirit kept them filled with hope throughout those dark, hopeless years in the concentration camp.   The same joy, enthusiasm, discipline and purpose that Eric Liddell displayed as a world class runner were the qualities he employed in bolstering the morale of inmates in a desperate situation. Even the prison guards regarded his integrity so highly that they asked him to prepare their food.  When Great Britain tried freeing Eric Liddell by arranging a prisoner exchange, he gave up his spot to a pregnant woman, choosing to remain with the other prisoners until they could be freed.   Most of the other prisoners were indeed freed, but Eric Liddell died of malnourishment and a brain tumor a few weeks before their liberation.  His last words were, “It is complete surrender.”   “It is complete surrender.”  Such was the way he approached his running, his life and his faith.  So, too, my hope and prayer is that when you run, you feel God’s pleasure.  My hope and prayer is that you use your running to express the joy, strength, passion and purpose of your soul.  For if you achieve this ambition, you will have realized the essence of what the privilege of running is all about.  God bless you.

Dr. Wm. Richard Kremer

December 1, 2011

 

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My top 3 additions to any workout

I have always really liked doing something a little extra at the end of each workout. A lot of people will do some strides to close out the day’s workout. Here are a few examples of organized strides with different focuses. Try them out and let me know what you think.

My top 3 additions to any workout:

Finish your workout and then rest for 5 minutes and add:
1. 6X60m with 90sec recovery in the grass @ Maximum Effort

This addition focuses on pure sprint speed. The recovery is 90sec because it takes 90sec for 90% of your Creatine Phosphate stores to be “re-phosphoralated” or replenished. This will help you improve your pure speed. I like doing this one after longer intervals.

2. 4X300m with 2-3mins recovery on the track @ 100% of 800m Race Pace

This addition is likely to create an influx of Lactic Acid that will kick you butt. This is a pure Lactate Tolerance addition. This will improve you ability to sustain a fast kick at the end of a race. I like doing this one after long intervals.

Finish your workout and then rest for 2mins and add:
1. 6X100m with 15sec rest in the grass @ Maximum Effort

This addition will create a very tough finish to your workout and allow you to work on your sprint finish while you are tired. The hardest part of this workout addition is the short 15sec recovery between the sprints.

 

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Marathon Workouts and how to progress them…

I have studied the marathon through several avenues.  One of the most helpful has been the conversations and emails that I have sent back and forth with Arthur Lydiard in 2001 and more recently with Renato Canova in 2010 (I have only had a few conversations and emails with Renato, but I have followed him on letsrun.com for several years).  A lot of my terminology and workouts are from Renato Canova.

First I want to say that there are too many different terminologies out there in the coaching world that describe the same thing and that we do need to talk about the different wording and make sure we are on the same page.  I have listened to coaches say the same things using different words and not understand each other due to one person using the word “tempo” and the other using the word “Lactate Threshold.”  If you have a question about a term then please ask.  Italian Coach, Renato Canova has shaped a lot of my thinking.  Renato knows that I have adopted his philosophy and he is helping me further develop it.  In my opinion he is the greatest coach in the world!

The greatest determinate of POTENTIAL is basic speed and speed endurance in the endurance events.  The greatest determinate of PERFORMANCE is your lactate processing system (Aerobic Threshold, Anaerobic Threshold, Maximum Lactate Steady State, Lactate Tolerance).  Improving performance in the endurance events is related to the VOLUME and the INTENSITY that the athlete is able to train at while managing the stress and recovery process.  The first thing that we must do is build volume and intensity together.  Too many coaches focus on one or the other but to properly develop the athlete to their POTENTIAL it is necessary to improve speed endurance and maintain or improve basic speed (depending on the event and the speed required for that event) while building VOLUME and INTENSITY that is specific to their race.

I have sectioned the workouts into Fundamental, Special, and Specific training.

Fundamental is training that is very basic and not specific to the event you are training for but allows you to lay a base of basic fitness for workout that are more specific later in the training program.  It is important to note that there is always some training that is specific to the goal race in each phase of training.  The best way to explain each phase is to say that the name of the phase simply describes the primary goal of the phase.

Special training is characterized by shorter intervals (400’s-800’s @ a pace faster than goal race pace) or longer intervals (1k’s to 3k’s @ a pace slower than goal race pace).  Typically special workouts have less recovery time between intervals than the specific.

Specific training is characterized by longer intervals at or above race pace with longer recoveries.  You can simply take the workouts from the Special period and extend them. For example instead of doing 10X800m @102% of race pace w/2’ recovery you extend the workout to do 6X1k @102% of race pace w/2’ recovery.

Also, there is General training which is training that is not related specifically to the sport of running.  I would put exercises, drills, cross training, etc into this category.  I use this often for recovery or for extra volume when running might not fit into the training program.

Since this blog is about the training for marathon I have detailed workouts that you can use for the marathon below.  A lot of these workouts are ones that I have studied and used with my athletes from years of following Renato Canova.  The workouts are not meant to be simply copied for every athlete but by looking at the workouts I think you can begin to see the progression and from that you can learn to adapt your workouts to specific athletes needs.  Always you will need to make an adjustment in volumes for different athletes ages or progress levels but the same principles still remain.

Also, I use the term WORKOUT WARMUP and WORKOUT COOLDOWN in the workouts below.  You can view a full WORKOUT WARMUP and WORKOUT COOLDOWN at www.gogorunning.com.

General:

Cross training, other sports, exercises, drills, agility, or other training that allows you the base to complete the Fundamental workouts.

Fundamental:

Threshold Running:

WORKOUT WARMUP, 8K-20K Progression from Aerobic Threshold to Anaerobic Threshold (I call this Zone 2 to Zone 3 and even to 100% of 10k Race Pace, see the pacing calculator here).

Easy running:

This could fall into the General category

Long Runs:

Progressing all season with the following example of progression.  Running 1 long run per week.  Also, I think that the world of Marathon Running has been most influenced by the progression of quality long runs.  You can think of the long runs as easy for a very young athlete and then as the athlete gets older you will want to progress the long runs in volume and intensity.  I like to build the long run in volume and then start rotating weeks between 2hrs and 90mins where the 2hrs steadily introduces more of the long run at Zone 2 until you are doing 3miles easy jogging, 12miles @Zone 2, 2-3miles easy jogging and then the 90mins progresses from Zone 1 to Zone 2.5 progressing slowly the entire run.  The 90mins sometimes goes to Zone 3 if the athlete is “feeling good.”  Below is an example of 11 weeks progression of the Long Run.

40mins, 70mins, 90mins, 1h 40mins, 1hr 50mins, 2hrs, 90mins, 2hrs, 90mins, 2hrs, 90mins

Also, cross training, or other training that allows you the base to complete the Special workouts can fall into this category.

Long intervals ca go here too like the one below:

WORKOUT WARMUP, 3000m + 2X2000m + 5X1000m + 6X500m w/3′ after 3k and 2k, 2′ after 1k, 1’30” after 500, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

Any Fartlek workouts can be considered Fundamental as well.

Special:

1hr WARMUP, 12 miles of 1mile @ 100% of Mar Pace / 800m @Z2 , 10mins COOLDOWN

WORKOUT WARMUP, 12X1000m w/2′ rec @105% of Half Mar RP, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

WORKOUT WARMUP, 25X600m w/1′ rec @105% of Half Mar RP or faster, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

WORKOUT WARMUP, 6X2k w/2′ to 3′ rec @102 to 105% of Half Mar RP, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

WORKOUT WARMUP, 9X1mile w/3′ rec @102% RP to 105% of Half Mar RP, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

LUNGE MATRIX, 1hr TOTAL @Z0 to Z2, Drills, 4X200m Strides, 1600m/1200m/800m/400m/200m @100% of 5k RP for the 1600m and 1200m, 100% of 3k RP for 800m, 100% of 1500m RP for 400m and 200m, 10mins cool down

WORKOUT WARMUP, 3000m + 1X2000m + 4X1000m + 4X500m w/3′ after 3k and 2k, 2′ after 1k, 1’30” after 500 @102% of Half Mar RP for 3k and 2k, 105% of Half Mar RP or faster for 1k’s and 500’s, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

WORKOUT WARMUP, 2mile @ 100% of Half Mar RP, 3′ recovery, 2X(1mie @ 100% of 10k RP, 1’30” rec, 1mile @ 100% of Half Mar RP, 3′ rec), WORKOUT COOLDOWN

WORKOUT WARMUP, 2mile @ 100% of Half Mar RP, 3′ recovery, 3X(1mile @ 100% of 10k RP, 1’30” rec, 1mile @ 100% of Half Mar RP, 3′ rec), WORKOUT COOLDOWN

WORKOUT WARMUP, 15k Continuous @102% Half Mar RP, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

WORKOUT WARMUP, 25k @97% of Half Mar RP, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

WORKOUT WARMUP, 3mile /2mile/ 1mile @102-105% Half Mar RP w/800m recovery in Z1.5 , WORKOUT COOLDOWN

WORKOUT WARMUP, 3X2mile @102-105% Half Mar RP w/800m recovery in Z1.5 , WORKOUT COOLDOWN

WORKOUT WARMUP, 3X3mile @102-105% Half Mar RP w/800m recovery in Z1.5 , WORKOUT COOLDOWN

WORKOUT WARMUP, 4X5k w/1000 in Z1.5 @102-105% Half Mar RP, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

WORKOUT WARMUP, 5X3k w/1000 in Z1.5 @102-105% Half Mar RP, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

WORKOUT WARMUP, 7X2k w/ 400 rec in 2′ @102-105% Half Mar RP, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

WORKOUT WARMUP, 4miles Tempo @ Z2, 3mins rec, + 4X2′-ON/2′-OFF @100% of 10k RP, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

RACE WARMUP, Race Half Marathon, RACE COOLDOWN

Specific:

WORKOUT WARMUP, 25k @102% of Marathon RP, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

WORKOUT WARMUP, 30k @ 100% of Marathon RP, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

WORKOUT WARMUP, 35k @97% of Marathon RP, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

WORKOUT WARMUP, 40k @ 92% Marathon RP, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

WORKOUT WARMUP, 4X6k @102% of Marathon RP w/1k recovery @Z1.5, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

WORKOUT WARMUP, 5X5k @102% of Marathon RP w/1k recovery @Z1.5, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

WORKOUT WARMUP, 6X4k @102% of Marathon RP w/1k rec @Zone 1.5, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

WORKOUT WARMUP, 4miles Tempo @ Z2, 3mins rec, + 4X2′-ON/2′-OFF @100% of 10k RP, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

RACE WARMUP, Race Marathon!, RACE COOLDOWN

 

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Jay Stephenson’s 9 motivation tips that will get you out the door

Jay Stephenson’s 9 motivation tips that will get you out the door (In no particular order):

Getting out the door for workout, long run, or even an easy run can be really tough some days.  It is especially when you are flying solo, it’s cold, raining, your tired, hungry and just not feeling it.

Recently I was really not feeling it so I decided to pull out every trick I could think of and it worked really well.  Here is what I did to go from not feeling it to ready to rock and roll.

#1: GPS Watch

The old school in me does not like the fact that I have become so dependent on using a GPS watch (I am currently using the Garmin 210).  However, on those days when I having a hard time it is nice that the watch allows me to have a gauge of what pace I am running no matter where I am.  This is a great help if you are traveling or running in an unfamiliar place.

#2: Compression Socks

I am not sure why but they just make me feel cooler.  Also, I think that it really does help my calfs feel better when they are sore or tight.

#3: Tea or Coffee

If it is a workout then tea or coffee is a must for me.  The little extra caffeine helps to wake me up a little and focus better.  I have noticed that this is a big part of a lot of peoples’ routines.

#4: Those Favorite Flats

Recently my favorite flats are the RC1400 by New Balance.  I will admit I was a bit skeptical of New Balance flats but these flats are by far the best flats that I have ever had.  They have a wider toe box in the right places so that they are still snug but give my toes room to move.  They are fairly responsive but have good cushion as well.

#5: Light Weight Training Jacket

Unless it is summer time I like to at least warm-up in my Nike Vapor Jacket.  This is the best jacket I have ever owned.  It is not that warm but it has a great fit for a runner and is very lightweight.

#6: Favorite Shorts

My Favorite Shorts are my shortest ones, which show a little too much skin for some people.  I don’t know what it is about these shorts but they make me feel faster.

#7: I-Pod

Make sure you don’t wear the I-Pod on a busy street or trail that you might need to hear a car, bike, or dog.

#8: Do a workout that you like

If I am not feeling good my go to workout is to do some type of fartlek where I don’t worry about the pace of the run and I just focus on my effort.

#9: Read your log before you go run

This is my number 1 thing to do before a run to get me going.  I enjoy the process of running and recording my progress.  I think when I read about past successes and even failures it reminds me about that the journey far outweighs the end results and it makes me want more of that journey.

 

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Lifetime Running Volume Progression
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1500m Workouts and how to progress them…

I have studied the 1500m through several avenues. One of the most helpful has been the conversations and emails that I have sent back and forth with Arthur Lydiard in 2001 and more recently with Renato Canova in 2010 (I have only had a few conversations and emails with Renato, but I have followed him on letsrun.com for several years). A lot of my terminology and workouts are from Renato Canova.

First I want to say that there are too many different terminologies out there in the coaching world that describe the same thing and that we do need to talk about the different wording and make sure we are on the same page. I have listened to coaches say the same things using different words and not understand each other due to one person using the word “tempo” and the other using the word “Lactate Threshold.” If you have a question about a term then please ask. Italian Coach, Renato Canova has shaped a lot of my thinking. Renato knows that I have adopted his philosophy and he is helping me further develop it. In my opinion he is the greatest coach in the world!

The greatest determinate of POTENTIAL is basic speed and speed endurance in the endurance events. The greatest determinate of PERFORMANCE is your lactate processing system (Aerobic Threshold, Anaerobic Threshold, Maximum Lactate Steady State, Lactate Tolerance). Improving performance in the endurance events is related to the VOLUME and the INTENSITY that the athlete is able to train at while managing the stress and recovery process. The first thing that we must do is build volume and intensity together. Too many coaches focus on one or the other but to properly develop the athlete to their POTENTIAL it is necessary to improve speed endurance and maintain or improve basic speed (depending on the event and the speed required for that event) while building VOLUME and INTENSITY that is specific to their race.

I have sectioned the workouts into Fundamental, Special, and Specific training.

Fundamental is training that is very basic and not specific to the event you are training for but allows you to lay a base of basic fitness for workout that are more specific later in the training program. It is important to note that there is always some training that is specific to the goal race in each phase of training. The best way to explain each phase is to say that the name of the phase simply describes the primary goal of the phase.

Special training is characterized by shorter intervals (400’s-800’s @ a pace faster than goal race pace) or longer intervals (1k’s to 3k’s @ a pace slower than goal race pace). Typically special workouts have less recovery time between intervals than the specific.

Specific training is characterized by longer intervals at or above race pace with longer recoveries. You can simply take the workouts from the Special period and extend them. For example instead of doing 10X800m @102% of race pace w/2’ recovery you extend the workout to do 6X1k @102% of race pace w/2’ recovery.

Also, there is General training which is training that is not related specifically to the sport of running. I would put exercises, drills, cross training, etc into this category. I use this often for recovery or for extra volume when running might not fit into the training program.

Since this blog is about the training for 1500m I have detailed workouts that you can use for the 1500m below. A lot of these workouts are ones that I have studied and used with my athletes from years of following Renato Canova. The workouts are not meant to be simply copied for every athlete but by looking at the workouts I think you can begin to see the progression and from that you can learn to adapt your workouts to specific athletes needs. Always you will need to make an adjustment in volumes for different athletes ages or progress levels but the same principles still remain.

Also, I use the term WORKOUT WARMUP and WORKOUT COOLDOWN in the workouts below. You can view a full WORKOUT WARMUP and WORKOUT COOLDOWN at www.gogorunning.com.

General:
Cross training, other sports, exercises, drills, agility, or other training that allows you the base to complete the Fundamental workouts.

Fundamental:
Threshold Running:
WORKOUT WARMUP, 8K-20K Progression from Aerobic Threshold to Anaerobic Threshold (I call this Zone 2 to Zone 3 and even to 100% of 10k Race Pace, see the pacing calculator here).

Easy running:
This could fall into the General category

Long Runs:
Progressing all season with the following example of progression. Running 1 long run per week. Also, I think that the world of Marathon Running has been most influenced by the progression of quality long runs. You can think of the long runs as easy for a very young athlete and then as the athlete gets older you will want to progress the long runs in volume and intensity. I like to build the long run in volume and then start rotating weeks between 2hrs and 90mins where the 2hrs steadily introduces more of the long run at Zone 2 until you are doing 3miles easy jogging, 12miles @Zone 2, 2-3miles easy jogging and then the 90mins progresses from Zone 1 to Zone 2.5 progressing slowly the entire run. The 90mins sometimes goes to Zone 3 if the athlete is “feeling good.” Below is an example of 11 weeks progression of the Long Run.

40mins, 70mins, 90mins, 1h 40mins, 1hr 50mins, 2hrs, 90mins, 2hrs, 90mins, 2hrs, 90mins

Also, cross training, or other training that allows you the base to complete the Special workouts can fall into this category.

Long intervals ca go here too like the one below:
WORKOUT WARMUP, 3000m + 2X2000m + 5X1000m + 6X500m w/3′ after 3k and 2k, 2′ after 1k, 1’30” after 500, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

Any Fartlek workouts can be considered Fundamental as well.

Special:
WORKOUT WARMUP, 10X600m w/ 6′ to 8′ rec @92-95% of 1500m RP, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

WORKOUT WARMUP, 16X400m w/2′ rec @92% to 95% of 1500m RP or faster, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

WORKOUT WARMUP, 30X200m w/30′ rec @92% to 95% of 1500m RP or faster, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

WORKOUT WARMUP, 3X1000m w/2′ rec @92-95% of 1500m RP, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

Specific:
WORKOUT WARMUP, 2000m @98% of 1500m RP + 1000 @101% of 1500m RP + 600 @102% of 1500m RP w/6′ rec, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

WORKOUT WARMUP, 20X200m w/30″ rec @100% of 1500m RP or faster, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

WORKOUT WARMUP, 2miles @Z3, 5mins rec, 8X400m w/ 2min rec @101% of 1500m RP, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

WORKOUT WARMUP, 2X8X300 w/45″ b/t reps and 4′ b/t sets @101% of 1500m RP, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

WORKOUT WARMUP, 3X1k w/6′ to 8′ rec @99% of 1500m RP, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

WORKOUT WARMUP, 5X600m w/ 3′ to 4′ rec @99-100% 1500m RP, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

WORKOUT WARMUP, 8X400m w/ 2′ @101% of 1500m RP, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

RACE WARMUP, Race 1500m, RACE COOLDOWN

 

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800m Workouts and how to progress them…

I have studied the 800m through several avenues.  One of the most helpful has been the conversations and emails that I have sent back and forth with Arthur Lydiard in 2001 and more recently with Renato Canova in 2010 (I have only had a few conversations and emails with Renato, but I have followed him on letsrun.com for several years).  A lot of my terminology and workouts are from Renato Canova.

First I want to say that there are too many different terminologies out there in the coaching world that describe the same thing and that we do need to talk about the different wording and make sure we are on the same page.  I have listened to coaches say the same things using different words and not understand each other due to one person using the word “tempo” and the other using the word “Lactate Threshold.”  If you have a question about a term then please ask.  Italian Coach, Renato Canova has shaped a lot of my thinking.  Renato knows that I have adopted his philosophy and he is helping me further develop it.  In my opinion he is the greatest coach in the world!

The greatest determinate of POTENTIAL is basic speed and speed endurance in the endurance events.  The greatest determinate of PERFORMANCE is your lactate processing system (Aerobic Threshold, Anaerobic Threshold, Maximum Lactate Steady State, Lactate Tolerance).  Improving performance in the endurance events is related to the VOLUME and the INTENSITY that the athlete is able to train at while managing the stress and recovery process.  The first thing that we must do is build volume and intensity together.  Too many coaches focus on one or the other but to properly develop the athlete to their POTENTIAL it is necessary to improve speed endurance and maintain or improve basic speed (depending on the event and the speed required for that event) while building VOLUME and INTENSITY that is specific to their race.

I have sectioned the workouts into Fundamental, Special, and Specific training.

Fundamental is training that is very basic and not specific to the event you are training for but allows you to lay a base of basic fitness for workout that are more specific later in the training program.  It is important to note that there is always some training that is specific to the goal race in each phase of training.  The best way to explain each phase is to say that the name of the phase simply describes the primary goal of the phase.

Special training is characterized by shorter intervals (400’s-800’s @ a pace faster than goal race pace) or longer intervals (1k’s to 3k’s @ a pace slower than goal race pace).  Typically special workouts have less recovery time between intervals than the specific.

Specific training is characterized by longer intervals at or above race pace with longer recoveries.  You can simply take the workouts from the Special period and extend them. For example instead of doing 10X800m @102% of race pace w/2’ recovery you extend the workout to do 6X1k @102% of race pace w/2’ recovery.

Also, there is General training which is training that is not related specifically to the sport of running.  I would put exercises, drills, cross training, etc into this category.  I use this often for recovery or for extra volume when running might not fit into the training program.

Since this blog is about the training for 800m I have detailed workouts that you can use for the 800m below.  A lot of these workouts are ones that I have studied and used with my athletes from years of following Renato Canova.  The workouts are not meant to be simply copied for every athlete but by looking at the workouts I think you can begin to see the progression and from that you can learn to adapt your workouts to specific athletes needs.  Always you will need to make an adjustment in volumes for different athletes ages or progress levels but the same principles still remain.

Also, I use the term WORKOUT WARMUP and WORKOUT COOLDOWN in the workouts below.  You can view a full WORKOUT WARMUP and WORKOUT COOLDOWN at www.gogorunning.com.

General:

Cross training, other sports, exercises, drills, agility, or other training that allows you the base to complete the Fundamental workouts.

Fundamental:

Threshold Running:

WORKOUT WARMUP, 8K-20K Progression from Aerobic Threshold to Anaerobic Threshold (I call this Zone 2 to Zone 3 and even to 100% of 10k Race Pace, see the pacing calculator here).

Easy running:

This could fall into the General category

Long Runs:

Progressing all season with the following example of progression.  Running 1 long run per week.  Also, I think that the world of Marathon Running has been most influenced by the progression of quality long runs.  You can think of the long runs as easy for a very young athlete and then as the athlete gets older you will want to progress the long runs in volume and intensity.  I like to build the long run in volume and then start rotating weeks between 2hrs and 90mins where the 2hrs steadily introduces more of the long run at Zone 2 until you are doing 3miles easy jogging, 12miles @Zone 2, 2-3miles easy jogging and then the 90mins progresses from Zone 1 to Zone 2.5 progressing slowly the entire run.  The 90mins sometimes goes to Zone 3 if the athlete is “feeling good.”  Below is an example of 11 weeks progression of the Long Run.

40mins, 70mins, 90mins, 1h 40mins, 1hr 50mins, 2hrs, 90mins, 2hrs, 90mins, 2hrs, 90mins

Also, cross training, or other training that allows you the base to complete the Special workouts can fall into this category.

Long intervals ca go here too like the one below:

WORKOUT WARMUP, 3000m + 2X2000m + 5X1000m + 6X500m w/3′ after 3k and 2k, 2′ after 1k, 1’30” after 500, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

Any Fartlek workouts can be considered Fundamental as well.

Special:

WORKOUT WARMUP, 10X400m w/2′ rec @92% to 95% of 800m RP or faster, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

WORKOUT WARMUP, 20X200m w/1min rec @92% to 95% of 800m RP or faster, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

WORKOUT WARMUP, 2X1000m w/2′ rec @92% to 95% of 800m RP or faster, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

WORKOUT WARMUP, 4X800m w/2′ rec @92% to 95% of 800m RP or faster, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

WORKOUT WARMUP, 6-8X800m w/2′ rec @92-95% of 800m RP, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

WORKOUT WARMUP, 6X600m w/2′ rec @92% to 95% of 800m RP or faster, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

Specific:

WORKOUT WARMUP, 1000m @98% of 800m RP + 400 @101% of 800m RP + 200 @102% of 800m RP w/8′ rec, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

WORKOUT WARMUP, 10X200m w/1′ rec @100% of 800m RP or faster, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

WORKOUT WARMUP, 3X3X300m w/ 3′ recovery b/t reps and 9′ b/t sets @102% of 800m RP, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

WORKOUT WARMUP, 400m @105% of 800m RP w/5mins rec, 2X200m @110% of 800m RP w/1′ rec, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

WORKOUT WARMUP, 4X400m w/ 5′ to 6′ rec @101% of 800m RP, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

WORKOUT WARMUP, 6X600m w/ 6′ to 8′ rec @99-100% of 800m RP, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

WORKOUT WARMUP, 2X8X300 w/45″ b/t reps and 4′ b/t sets @101% of 1500m RP, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

RACE WARMUP, Race 800m, RACE COOLDOWN

 

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10k Workouts and how to progress them…

I have studied the 10k through several avenues. One of the most helpful has been the conversations and emails that I have sent back and forth with Arthur Lydiard in 2001 and more recently with Renato Canova in 2010 (I have only had a few conversations and emails with Renato, but I have followed him on letsrun.com for several years). A lot of my terminology and workouts are from Renato Canova.

First I want to say that there are too many different terminologies out there in the coaching world that describe the same thing and that we do need to talk about the different wording and make sure we are on the same page. I have listened to coaches say the same things using different words and not understand each other due to one person using the word “tempo” and the other using the word “Lactate Threshold.” If you have a question about a term then please ask. Italian Coach, Renato Canova has shaped a lot of my thinking. Renato knows that I have adopted his philosophy and he is helping me further develop it. In my opinion he is the greatest coach in the world!

The greatest determinate of POTENTIAL is basic speed and speed endurance in the endurance events. The greatest determinate of PERFORMANCE is your lactate processing system (Aerobic Threshold, Anaerobic Threshold, Maximum Lactate Steady State, Lactate Tolerance). Improving performance in the endurance events is related to the VOLUME and the INTENSITY that the athlete is able to train at while managing the stress and recovery process. The first thing that we must do is build volume and intensity together. Too many coaches focus on one or the other but to properly develop the athlete to their POTENTIAL it is necessary to improve speed endurance and maintain or improve basic speed (depending on the event and the speed required for that event) while building VOLUME and INTENSITY that is specific to their race.

I have sectioned the workouts into Fundamental, Special, and Specific training.

Fundamental is training that is very basic and not specific to the event you are training for but allows you to lay a base of basic fitness for workout that are more specific later in the training program. It is important to note that there is always some training that is specific to the goal race in each phase of training. The best way to explain each phase is to say that the name of the phase simply describes the primary goal of the phase.

Special training is characterized by shorter intervals (400’s-800’s @ a pace faster than goal race pace) or longer intervals (1k’s to 3k’s @ a pace slower than goal race pace). Typically special workouts have less recovery time between intervals than the specific.

Specific training is characterized by longer intervals at or above race pace with longer recoveries. You can simply take the workouts from the Special period and extend them. For example instead of doing 10X800m @102% of race pace w/2’ recovery you extend the workout to do 6X1k @102% of race pace w/2’ recovery.

Also, there is General training which is training that is not related specifically to the sport of running. I would put exercises, drills, cross training, etc into this category. I use this often for recovery or for extra volume when running might not fit into the training program.

Since this blog is about the training for 10k I have detailed workouts that you can use for the 10k below. A lot of these workouts are ones that I have studied and used with my athletes from years of following Renato Canova. The workouts are not meant to be simply copied for every athlete but by looking at the workouts I think you can begin to see the progression and from that you can learn to adapt your workouts to specific athletes needs. You will always need to make adjustments in volumes for different athletes ages or progress levels but the same principles still remain.

Also, I use the term WORKOUT WARMUP and WORKOUT COOLDOWN in the workouts below. You can view a full WORKOUT WARMUP and WORKOUT COOLDOWN at www.gogorunning.com.

General:
Cross training, other sports, exercises, drills, agility, or other training that allows you the base to complete the Fundamental workouts.

Fundamental:
Threshold Running:
WORKOUT WARMUP, 8K-20K Progression from Aerobic Threshold to Anaerobic Threshold (I call this Zone 2 to Zone 3 to Zone 4, see the pacing calculator here).

Easy running:
This could fall into the General category or Fundamental

Long Runs:
Progressing all season with the following example of progression. Running 1 long run per week. Also, I think that the world of Marathon Running has been most influenced by the progression of quality long runs. You can think of the long runs as easy for a very young athlete and then as the athlete gets older you will want to progress the long runs in volume and intensity. I like to build the long run in volume and then start rotating weeks between 2hrs and 90mins where the 2hrs steadily introduces more of the long run at Zone 2 until you are doing 3miles easy jogging, 12miles @Zone 2, 2-3miles easy jogging and then the 90mins progresses from Zone 1 to Zone 2.5 progressing slowly the entire run. The 90mins sometimes goes to Zone 3 if the athlete is “feeling good.” Below is an example of 11 weeks progression of the Long Run.

40mins, 70mins, 90mins, 1h 40mins, 1hr 50mins, 2hrs, 90mins, 2hrs, 90mins, 2hrs, 90mins

Also, cross training, or other training that allows you the base to complete the Special workouts can fall into this category.

Long intervals ca go here too like the one below:
WORKOUT WARMUP, 3000m + 2X2000m + 5X1000m + 6X500m w/3′ after 3k and 2k, 2′ after 1k, 1’30” after 500, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

Any Fartlek workouts can be considered Fundamental as well.

WORKOUT WARMUP, 5mins @10k Pace, 3mins recovery, 4X1′-ON/1′-OFF, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

Special:
WORKOUT WARMUP, 3000m + 1X2000m + 4X1000m + 4X500m w/3min recovery after 3k and 2k, 2min after 1k, 1min 30secs after 500 @95% of of 10k RP for 3k and 2k, 98% of 10k RP or faster for 1k’s and 500’s, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

WORKOUT WARMUP, 12X1k w/2’30” recovery @98% of 10k RP or faster, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

WORKOUT WARMUP, 12X800m w/2′ recovery @100% of 10K Race Pace or faster, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

WORKOUT WARMUP, 1k/2k/3k/3k/2k/1k w/3′ recovery @95% of of 10k RP for 3k and 2k, 98% of 10k RP or faster for 1k’s, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

WORKOUT WARMUP, 20mins @Z3 + 10X1′-ON/1′-OFF Fartlek @100% of 5k RP or faster, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

WORKOUT WARMUP, 20mins @Z3 + 4X1k w/2’30” recovery @98% of 10k RP or faster, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

WORKOUT WARMUP, 20mins @Z3 + 5X1k w/2’30” recovery @98% of 10k RP or faster, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

WORKOUT WARMUP, 25X400m w/1′ recovery @102% of 10k RP or faster, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

WORKOUT WARMUP, 2miles @Z3, 5mins rec, 6X400m w/ 1min 30sec rec @100% of 5k RP, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

WORKOUT WARMUP, 5X1mile w/3′ recovery @98% of 10k RP or faster, 5mins, 3X300m with full recovery @100% 0f 1500m Race Pace, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

WORKOUT WARMUP, 6X1mile w/3′ recovery @98% of 10k RP or faster, 5mins jog, 3X1min ON/ 1min OFF Form work or 3X300m @ 100% of 1500m Race Pace, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

WORKOUT WARMUP, 6X2k + 1000m w/2:30′ recovery @98% of 10k RP for the 2k’s and Maximum Speed for the 1k, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

Specific:
WORKOUT WARMUP, 10X1k w/2′ recovery @100% to 102% of 10k RP or faster, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

WORKOUT WARMUP, 15X600m w/1’30” recovery @102% to 105% of 10k Race Pace or faster, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

WORKOUT WARMUP, 3000m + 1X2000m + 4X1000m + 4X500m w/3′ recovery after 3k, 2′ after 2k, 1’30” after 1000’s and 500’s @98% of of 10k RP for 3k, 100% of 10k RP for 2k, 102% of 10k RP or faster for 1k’s and 500’s, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

WORKOUT WARMUP, 3000m + 2X2000m + 4X1000m + 4X500m w/3′ after 3k, 2′ after 2k, 1’30” after 1000m @98% of of 10k RP for 3k, 100% of 10k RP for 2k, 102% of 10k RP or faster for 1k’s, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

WORKOUT WARMUP, 3X2k alternating 400m hard (100% of 3k Race Pace)/ moderate (100% of Half Mar RP) w/5mins recovery, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

WORKOUT WARMUP, 4X2k + 1000m w/4′ recovery @100% to 102% of 10k RP or faster, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

WORKOUT WARMUP, 2mile @ 100% of Half Mar RP, 3′ recovery, 2X(1mie @ 100% of 10k RP, 1’30” rec, 1mile @ 100% of Half Mar RP, 3′ rec), WORKOUT COOLDOWN

WORKOUT WARMUP, 2mile @ 100% of Half Mar RP, 3′ recovery, 3X(1mile @ 100% of 10k RP, 1’30” rec, 1mile @ 100% of Half Mar RP, 3′ rec), WORKOUT COOLDOWN

RACE WARMUP, Race 10k, RACE COOLDOWN

 

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3000m Workouts and how to progress them…

I have studied the 3000m through several avenues. One of the most helpful has been the conversations and emails that I have sent back and forth with Arthur Lydiard in 2001 and more recently with Renato Canova in 2010 (I have only had a few conversations and emails with Renato, but I have followed him on letsrun.com for several years). A lot of my terminology and workouts are from Renato Canova.

First I want to say that there are too many different terminologies out there in the coaching world that describe the same thing and that we do need to talk about the different wording and make sure we are on the same page. I have listened to coaches say the same things using different words and not understand each other due to one person using the word “tempo” and the other using the word “Lactate Threshold.” If you have a question about a term then please ask. Italian Coach, Renato Canova has shaped a lot of my thinking. Renato knows that I have adopted his philosophy and he is helping me further develop it. In my opinion he is the greatest coach in the world!

The greatest determinate of POTENTIAL is basic speed and speed endurance in the endurance events. The greatest determinate of PERFORMANCE is your lactate processing system (Aerobic Threshold, Anaerobic Threshold, Maximum Lactate Steady State, Lactate Tolerance). Improving performance in the endurance events is related to the VOLUME and the INTENSITY that the athlete is able to train at while managing the stress and recovery process. The first thing that we must do is build volume and intensity together. Too many coaches focus on one or the other but to properly develop the athlete to their POTENTIAL it is necessary to improve speed endurance and maintain or improve basic speed (depending on the event and the speed required for that event) while building VOLUME and INTENSITY that is specific to their race.

I have sectioned the workouts into Fundamental, Special, and Specific training.

Fundamental is training that is very basic and not specific to the event you are training for but allows you to lay a base of basic fitness for workout that are more specific later in the training program. It is important to note that there is always some training that is specific to the goal race in each phase of training. The best way to explain each phase is to say that the name of the phase simply describes the primary goal of the phase.

Special training is characterized by shorter intervals (400’s-800’s @ a pace faster than goal race pace) or longer intervals (1k’s to 3k’s @ a pace slower than goal race pace). Typically special workouts have less recovery time between intervals than the specific.

Specific training is characterized by longer intervals at or above race pace with longer recoveries. You can simply take the workouts from the Special period and extend them. For example instead of doing 10X800m @102% of race pace w/2’ recovery you extend the workout to do 6X1k @102% of race pace w/2’ recovery.

Also, there is General training which is training that is not related specifically to the sport of running. I would put exercises, drills, cross training, etc into this category. I use this often for recovery or for extra volume when running might not fit into the training program.

Since this blog is about the training for 3000m I have detailed workouts that you can use for the 3k below. A lot of these workouts are ones that I have studied and used with my athletes from years of following Renato Canova. The workouts are not meant to be simply copied for every athlete but by looking at the workouts I think you can begin to see the progression and from that you can learn to adapt your workouts to specific athletes needs. Always you will need to make an adjustment in volumes for different athletes ages or progress levels but the same principles still remain.

Also, I use the term WORKOUT WARMUP and WORKOUT COOLDOWN in the workouts below. You can view a full WORKOUT WARMUP and WORKOUT COOLDOWN at www.gogorunning.com.

General:
Cross training, other sports, exercises, drills, agility, or other training that allows you the base to complete the Fundamental workouts.

Fundamental:
Threshold Running:
WORKOUT WARMUP, 8K-20K Progression from Aerobic Threshold to Anaerobic Threshold (I call this Zone 2 to Zone 3 and even to 100% of 10k Race Pace, see the pacing calculator here).

Easy running:
This could fall into the General category

Long Runs:
Progressing all season with the following example of progression. Running 1 long run per week. Also, I think that the world of Marathon Running has been most influenced by the progression of quality long runs. You can think of the long runs as easy for a very young athlete and then as the athlete gets older you will want to progress the long runs in volume and intensity. I like to build the long run in volume and then start rotating weeks between 2hrs and 90mins where the 2hrs steadily introduces more of the long run at Zone 2 until you are doing 3miles easy jogging, 12miles @Zone 2, 2-3miles easy jogging and then the 90mins progresses from Zone 1 to Zone 2.5 progressing slowly the entire run. The 90mins sometimes goes to Zone 3 if the athlete is “feeling good.” Below is an example of 11 weeks progression of the Long Run.

40mins, 70mins, 90mins, 1h 40mins, 1hr 50mins, 2hrs, 90mins, 2hrs, 90mins, 2hrs, 90mins

Also, cross training, or other training that allows you the base to complete the Special workouts can fall into this category.

Long intervals ca go here too like the one below:
WORKOUT WARMUP, 3000m + 2X2000m + 5X1000m + 6X500m w/3′ after 3k and 2k, 2′ after 1k, 1’30” after 500, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

Any Fartlek workouts can be considered Fundamental as well.

Special:
WORKOUT WARMUP, 10X800m w/2′ rec @102% of 5k RP or faster, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

WORKOUT WARMUP, 2(6X1k) w/2’30” rec w/5mins between sets @98% of 5k RP or faster, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

WORKOUT WARMUP, 20X400m w/1′ rec @105% of 5k RP or faster, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

WORKOUT WARMUP, 2mile @98% of 5k RP + 4X1mile w/2’30” rec alternating @92% of 5k RP and 98% of 5k RP, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

WORKOUT WARMUP, 6X1mile w/2’30” rec @98% of 5k RP or faster, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

Specific:
WORKOUT WARMUP, 3k Time Trial, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

WORKOUT WARMUP, 1600m + 1200m + 800m + 400m + 200m @102% of 3K RP for 1600m and getting faster each rep w/400m jog rec in 3′, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

WORKOUT WARMUP, 3X3X600m w/1’30” rec @100% of 3k RP or faster, with 2′ rec between sets and 6X80m Hill Sprint after each set, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

WORKOUT WARMUP, 3X3X800m w/2′ rec @100% of 5k RP or faster with 2′ rec between sets and 4X80m Hill Sprint after each set, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

RACE WARMUP, Race 3k, RACE COOLDOWN

 

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3k Steeplechase Workouts and how to progress them…

I have studied the 3k steeplechase through several avenues. One of the most helpful has been the conversations and emails that I have sent back and forth with Arthur Lydiard in 2001 and more recently with Renato Canova in 2010 (I have only had a few conversations and emails with Renato, but I have followed him on letsrun.com for several years). A lot of my terminology and workouts are from Renato Canova.

First I want to say that there are too many different terminologies out there in the coaching world that describe the same thing and that we do need to talk about the different wording and make sure we are on the same page. I have listened to coaches say the same things using different words and not understand each other due to one person using the word “tempo” and the other using the word “Lactate Threshold.” If you have a question about a term then please ask. Italian Coach, Renato Canova has shaped a lot of my thinking. Renato knows that I have adopted his philosophy and he is helping me further develop it. In my opinion he is the greatest coach in the world!

The greatest determinate of POTENTIAL is basic speed and speed endurance in the endurance events. The greatest determinate of PERFORMANCE is your lactate processing system (Aerobic Threshold, Anaerobic Threshold, Maximum Lactate Steady State, Lactate Tolerance). Improving performance in the endurance events is related to the VOLUME and the INTENSITY that the athlete is able to train at while managing the stress and recovery process. The first thing that we must do is build volume and intensity together. Too many coaches focus on one or the other but to properly develop the athlete to their POTENTIAL it is necessary to improve speed endurance and maintain or improve basic speed (depending on the event and the speed required for that event) while building VOLUME and INTENSITY that is specific to their race.

I have sectioned the workouts into Fundamental, Special, and Specific training.

Fundamental is training that is very basic and not specific to the event you are training for but allows you to lay a base of basic fitness for workout that are more specific later in the training program. It is important to note that there is always some training that is specific to the goal race in each phase of training. The best way to explain each phase is to say that the name of the phase simply describes the primary goal of the phase.

Special training is characterized by shorter intervals (400’s-800’s @ a pace faster than goal race pace) or longer intervals (1k’s to 3k’s @ a pace slower than goal race pace). Typically special workouts have less recovery time between intervals than the specific.

Specific training is characterized by longer intervals at or above race pace with longer recoveries. You can simply take the workouts from the Special period and extend them. For example instead of doing 10X800m @102% of race pace w/2’ recovery you extend the workout to do 6X1k @102% of race pace w/2’ recovery.

Also, there is General training which is training that is not related specifically to the sport of running. I would put exercises, drills, cross training, etc into this category. I use this often for recovery or for extra volume when running might not fit into the training program.

Since this blog is about the training for 3k steeplechase I have detailed workouts that you can use for the 3k steeple below. A lot of these workouts are ones that I have studied and used with my athletes from years of following Renato Canova. The workouts are not meant to be simply copied for every athlete but by looking at the workouts I think you can begin to see the progression and from that you can learn to adapt your workouts to specific athletes needs. Always you will need to make an adjustment in volumes for different athletes ages or progress levels but the same principles still remain.

Also, I use the term WORKOUT WARMUP and WORKOUT COOLDOWN in the workouts below. You can view a full WORKOUT WARMUP and WORKOUT COOLDOWN at www.gogorunning.com.

General:
Cross training, other sports, exercises, drills, agility, or other training that allows you the base to complete the Fundamental workouts.

Fundamental:
Threshold Running:
WORKOUT WARMUP, 8K-20K Progression from Aerobic Threshold to Anaerobic Threshold (I call this Zone 2 to Zone 3 and even to 100% of 10k Race Pace, see the pacing calculator here).

Easy running:
This could fall into the General category

Long Runs:
Progressing all season with the following example of progression. Running 1 long run per week. Also, I think that the world of Marathon Running has been most influenced by the progression of quality long runs. You can think of the long runs as easy for a very young athlete and then as the athlete gets older you will want to progress the long runs in volume and intensity. I like to build the long run in volume and then start rotating weeks between 2hrs and 90mins where the 2hrs steadily introduces more of the long run at Zone 2 until you are doing 3miles easy jogging, 12miles @Zone 2, 2-3miles easy jogging and then the 90mins progresses from Zone 1 to Zone 2.5 progressing slowly the entire run. The 90mins sometimes goes to Zone 3 if the athlete is “feeling good.” Below is an example of 11 weeks progression of the Long Run.

40mins, 70mins, 90mins, 1h 40mins, 1hr 50mins, 2hrs, 90mins, 2hrs, 90mins, 2hrs, 90mins

Also, cross training, or other training that allows you the base to complete the Special workouts can fall into this category.

Long intervals ca go here too like the one below:
WORKOUT WARMUP, 3000m + 2X2000m + 5X1000m + 6X500m w/3′ after 3k and 2k, 2′ after 1k, 1’30” after 500, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

Any Fartlek workouts can be considered Fundamental as well.

Special:
WORKOUT WARMUP, 10X800m w/2′ rec @102% of 5k RP or faster, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

WORKOUT WARMUP, 2(6X1k) w/2’30” rec w/5mins between sets @98% of 5k RP or faster, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

WORKOUT WARMUP, 20X400m w/1′ rec @105% of 5k RP or faster, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

WORKOUT WARMUP, 2mile @98% of 5k RP + 4X1mile w/2’30” rec alternating @92% of 5k RP and 98% of 5k RP, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

WORKOUT WARMUP, 6X1mile w/2’30” rec @98% of 5k RP or faster, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

Specific:
WORKOUT WARMUP, 6X1600m on hilly terrain finishing with 400m fast on the track with 10 hurdles w/8mins recovery between each rep, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

WORKOUT WARMUP, 10X600m w/2′ rec @105% of 5k RP or faster with every other repetition over 5 hurdles, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

WORKOUT WARMUP, 3X3X800m w/2′ rec @100% of 5k RP or faster with 5 hurdles on reps 1 and 3 of each set, with 2′ rec betwwen sets and 6X80m Hill Sprint after each set, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

WORKOUT WARMUP, 6X1000m w/2’30” rec @99% of 5k RP or faster with every other repetition over 5 hurdles, WORKOUT COOLDOWN

RACE WARMUP, Race 3k Steeple Chase, RACE COOLDOWN

 

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Hill Training

By Jay Stephenson
Over the past 15 years I have written in my running journal every day. This habit is one of the reasons that running has been so enjoyable for me. Each year I can look back and see how the year went. As I was looking back at the last 15 years I saw a variety of workouts in my log. One of the most consistent workouts that I have done in my training program is regular hill training.
Hill workouts are some of the most rewarding workouts that you can do. They are very productive in building strength and promoting good running form. Here are some fun and creative examples of Hill Workouts.
Hill Circuits
I learned about how to do this workout at the 2011 Super Distance Summit in Charlotte NC. Famed coach of many of the worlds best athletes, Renato Canova shared this workout with us. The GoGoRunning team has put these three workouts on video for you to see here.

1. Fundamental Hill Circuit (This is done in the early season)
2. Special Hill Circuit (This is done mid-season)
3. Competition Hill Circuit (This is done late season)

Hill Repeats
Any distance of a moderately steep hill with a jog down recovery. I don’t suggest really steep hills as they don’t promote good running form as much as a moderately steep hill.

Hill Fartlek
On a route with rolling hills, push the uphill, jog the downhill, run moderate pace on the flat sections.

Hill Tempo
On a route with a long uphill (as much as 3-4miles of continuous uphill) run at an effort that is moderately hard the whole way. You can also do this on the treadmill.
Do you need help with your hill training or any of your training? Well that is what we are here for…fill out a free consult form and let’s get moving!

 

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7 tips from a Mom with a toddler on how to get your training in.

Are you a parent with young a child who just can’t seem to get your weekly mileage in? I have a 1 ½ year old and have found that being consistent with my training is very difficult…and we all know that being consistent with your running is really what makes us better at racing. Days, weeks, months and years of consistent running. So how do I balance the huge responsibility of being mom with a toddler and get my running done? Well it hasn’t been easy, but here are several tips on how I have been able to get the mileage done.

1. Go to a gym where there is child care.
2. Ask a babysitter to meet you at the track so that you can run your workout.
3. Have a college student come to your house for an “exchange” – she babysits your child while you run and in return she gets to do her laundry for free (soap included) and you cook her a meal after you run. I try to do this for my long run once a week in the morning and then cook banana pancakes and eggs for all of us. A yummy brunch after a long run!
4. Invest in a treadmill and run while the kiddo is sleeping.
5. Invest in a jogging stroller. Take the little one with you for an easy run.
6. Ask your spouse to go with you to run at your favorite trail. Take turns running / playing with your child.
7. Ask mom or mother-in-law or another relative who wants to spend time with your child to come and watch her while you run.

Of course there are many things a parent can do to balance exercise and kids. These are just the ways that I have been able to do it. Let’s add to this list. Moms and Dads: What are some other ways that you are able to get your run in? Post a comment and let us know!

 

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